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The latest updates on prescription drugs and ways to save from the GoodRx medical team

Eliquis Generic Alternative Coming in 2018?

by Tori Marsh on November 17, 2017 at 11:31 am

Eliquis is a common anticoagulant medication that helps prevent blood clots, stroke, and pulmonary embolism. Common, but not cheap: cash prices average around $488 for a 30-day supply. Currently, there is no Eliquis generic alternative available, but one could be available as early as 2018. Since Eliquis tends to be a maintenance drug, taken for a longer period of time, it can break the bank.  

If your doctor thinks Eliquis is right for you, how can you make it more affordable? Here’s some information on Eliquis and how you can save.

How popular is Eliquis?

Eliquis (apixaban) is the second most popular anticoagulant, a class of medications that also includes Coumadin (jantoven, warfarin), Xarelto, and Pradaxa. Commonly referred to as blood thinners, drugs in this class help to prevent blood clots that can cause deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, angina, stroke and heart attack.

When will generic Eliquis be available?

There are two things keeping generic Eliquis off the market for now. First, the FDA has granted Eliquis market exclusivity, which expires on December 24, 2017 (Market exclusivity prevents competitors from submitting new drug applications). There is also a patent on Eliquis which expires in February 2023. The patent prevents competitors from manufacturing and distributing alternatives.

This double-barreled protection means that we can’t be sure when generic Eliquis will be available. A generic alternative could be approved by the FDA as early as 2018, but the new generic might not hit pharmacies until 2022.

Another caveat: While generic manufacturers like Mylan are currently developing generic versions of Eliquis, multiple lawsuits from brand manufacturer Bristol-Myers Squibb are preventing these cheaper alternatives from making it to the market. With no end in sight for these lawsuits, it’s hard to say when we could see a generic alternative.

We will be sure to update with any information regarding a cheaper alternative for Eliquis.

Are there any cheaper alternative medications?

  • Coumadin (warfarin, jantoven). Coumadin is a popular coagulant that has two affordable generic alternatives, warfarin and jantoven, that can cost less than $10, and often as little as $4. $4 a month vs $488 a month? What’s the downside? Well, Coumadin can raise your risk of bleeding and bruising and requires regular blood work to ensure its effectiveness.
  • Other anticoagulants. Pradaxa or Xarelto are both still only available in brand form – so no cheaper generic versions. Still, these alternatives may be cheaper, especially considering your prescription insurance coverage.
  • For more information on how Eliquis compares to other anticoagulants, check out Iodine’s page on Eliquis alternatives. As always, you’ll want to speak with your doctor if you think another medication might work better for you.

Eliquis works best for me—can I still save?

Once you find a medication that works for you, it can be difficult to switch. But don’t worry, there are still other ways to save.

  • Fill a 90-day supply. This can help shave a little more off of your out-of-pocket costs. Be aware that you will need a new prescription from your doctor, and approval from your insurance to fill for a higher quantity. Check in with your doctor, insurance, and/or pharmacist.
  • Use an Eliquis coupon from GoodRx. GoodRx offers discounts for Eliquis online which can usually save at least 15% off the full retail price.
  • Save with a manufacturer coupon or the Eliquis patient assistance program. Eliquis’s two manufacturers, Pfizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb offer multiple ways to save. Manufacturer coupons can reduce your co-pay to as little as $10 per fill, while patient assistance programs can help you receive your medication at no cost. For more information on these programs, eligibility, and how to apply, be sure to read through our Eliquis Savings Tips or visit the Pfizer website.
  • Split a higher dosage pill. This can help reduce costs, especially if two strengths are priced similarly. You’ll want to check in with your doctor to see if this is a safe option for you
  • Try to appeal your coverage. If you have insurance and your plan doesn’t cover Eliquis, ask your doctor about submitting an appeal. Some plans require prior authorizations—meaning you need permission from your insurance plan and a special request from your doctor before you can fill your prescription. If you have insurance, call your provider and ask how to get this process started.

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