Intrarosa for Postmenopausal Women Now Available in Pharmacies

Roni Shye
Roni Shye, PharmD BCGP BCACP, is a licensed pharmacist in the states of Florida, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.
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Menopause is the period in a woman’s life when menstruation stops. It typically occurs between 45 and 50 years of age and can increase the risk for medical conditions like heart disease, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, weight gain, and painful intercourse.

The FDA has approved Intrarosa to treat dyspareunia (painful sexual intercourse), a common symptom of menopause, and it is now available in pharmacies.

What is Intrarosa indicated for?

Intrarosa is a steroid indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe dyspareunia, or painful sexual intercourse. This condition is a symptom of vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA), due to menopause. Intrarosa is unique in that it treats dyspareunia without using hormones.

VVA is a chronic condition commonly associated with the loss of estrogen due to menopause. Symptoms of VVA include vaginal dryness, itchiness or burning.

Intrarosa is available as a vaginal insert in the strength of 6.5 mg.

How do I use Intrarosa?

Intrarosa is to be inserted vaginally once daily at bedtime.

What are the common side effects associated with Intrarosa?

Common side effects include vaginal discharge or noticeable changes on a Pap smear.

Are there any treatments similar to Intrarosa?

Yes. Treatments available by prescription to help treat dyspareunia caused by VVA induce Vagifem (yuvafem), Estrace (estradiol), Estring (estradiol) and Premarin (conjugated estrogens).

Over the counter (OTC) medication DHEA (prasterone) is an oral supplement that is sometimes used to treat dyspareunia. However, the FDA has not evaluated it for safety or efficacy.

OTC vaginal lubricants and moisturizers may also help to avoid discomfort during sexual activity, and can usually be found in the feminine care aisle of your grocery store or pharmacy.

For more information on Intrarosa, see the press announcement from the FDA here.

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