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Xopenex HFA Coupon - Xopenex HFA 15g of 45mcg inhaler

Levalbuterol

LEVALBUTEROL is a bronchodilator. It helps open up the airways in your lungs to make it easier to breathe. This medicine is used to treat and to prevent bronchospasm. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of levalbuterol is around $29.45, 52% off the average retail price of $61.84. Compare short-acting beta agonists.
Xopenex HFA Coupon - Xopenex HFA 15g of 45mcg inhaler

Xopenex HFA Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Generic of Proair Asthma Inhaler Postponed, Again — Here’s How To Save Anyway

Tori Marsh - May 25, 2018

Proair is a common rescue inhaler used to treat asthma attacks, but it’s not cheap. Cash prices for one asthma inhaler average around $85. What’s more, since 2016, cash prices for Proair have increased by almost 70% — from $52 per inhaler to over $80 — and there’s still no generic available.

Even though it is expensive, Proair generally works well. Around 73% if people rate that Proair is worth it according to our friends at Iodine, and there are few side effects. See More

Here’s Why Asthma Inhalers Are So Expensive

Tori Marsh - April 18, 2018

In 2013, the New York Times published an expose on the high price of asthma inhalers, in an article headlined “The Soaring Cost of a Simple Breath.”

So what’s happened in the 5 years since? Prices have only gotten worse.

A GoodRx analysis of cash prices for asthma inhalers shows that prices have climbed about 35% since 2013, from an average price of around $280 in 2013 to more than $380 today.

The average cash price for one inhaler of Advair, a leading medication for asthma, increased from $316 in 2013 to $496 in 2018 – a 56% increase. See More

FDA Approves Xopenex HFA Generic for Asthma

Roni Shye - November 18, 2016

We have good news for the asthma community! A generic for Xopenex HFA, an inhalation aerosol used to treat bronchospasms, is available in pharmacies now!

The generic, levalbuterol, is a rescue inhaler used to immediately open the airways in your lungs for acute symptoms like shortness of breath, wheezing, or coughing. This is good news for your pocketbook!

What is levalbuterol used for?

Levalbuterol is indicted for the treatment or prevention of bronchospasm in patients 4 years of age or older, with reversible obstructive airway disease. See More

5 Exclusive Tips for Back to School Prescriptions

Roni Shye - September 08, 2015

Get those lunches made and set the alarm clocks; school’s back in session.
Parents know that a new school year means new clothes, new books, maybe a new backpack—and perhaps a new set of prescriptions. As a pharmacist, I know the school year has started when frustrated parents show up at my store with lots of questions.
The good news is that I can help! Here are 5 helpful solutions for common back-to-school medication issues. See More

Dropped by Insurance: Will Your Rescue Inhaler be Covered in 2015?

Roni Shye - October 15, 2014

As 2014 comes to a close, we should be thinking about what to expect for 2015. The start of a new year is a time for new challenges, new goals, and inevitably, a new prescription formulary.

What does this mean for you?

Express Scripts and Caremark have decided to make changes to the asthma rescue inhalers covered on their national preferred formularies, and have provided a list of covered alternatives. See More

Albuterol vs Levalbuterol HFA Inhalers: What’s the Difference?

Roni Shye - July 21, 2014

Albuterol and levalbuterol can be confusing right off the bat due to the sound-alike active ingredient names. Both are available as various brand name inhalers, though there are no generic albuterol or levalbuterol HFA inhalers at the moment. Both types of inhaler treat asthma and in some cases COPD, but they have different strengths and side effects and can vary in price.

Are albuterol and levalbuterol considered rescue or maintenance inhalers?

Both albuterol and levalbuterol are rescue inhalers. See More

50+ Brand-Name Drugs Dropped By Insurance in 2014

Elizabeth Davis - October 29, 2013

For many Americans with health insurance, more than 50 popular brand-name drugs may no longer be covered starting in January 2014. Express Scripts and Caremark, companies that handles pharmacy benefits for more than 200 million Americans, are removing almost 50 brands from their formularies at the end of 2013. More information is below.

What are Express Scripts and Caremark?

Express Scripts and Caremark are companies that administer prescription drug benefits for many health insurance companies and Tricare. See More

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