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Diazepam

DIAZEPAM is a benzodiazepine. It is used to treat anxiety and nervousness. It also can help treat alcohol withdrawal, relax muscles, and treat certain types of seizures. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of diazepam is around $6.83, 67% off the average retail price of $20.99. Compare benzodiazepines.
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8 Types of Medications That Can Cause Weight Gain As a Side Effect

Benita Lee - June 18, 2018

An unexpected increase in weight can be concerning for anyone. But it’s an unfortunate side effect of many common medications. Insulin, blood pressure medications, antidepressants, and even migraine medications can all cause weight gain, and some may even worsen the health conditions they’re trying to treat.

Sudden weight gain is never a reason to stop your medication without seeing your doctor first. See More

Depression and Anxiety Prescriptions Are Climbing Nationwide

Tori Marsh - June 07, 2018

Prescriptions for depression and anxiety medications are on the rise among Americans – and parts of the country appear to be coping with higher rates than others, according to a GoodRx analysis of prescription data for anxiety and depression medicines.

The data looks at the proportion of depression and anxiety medications among overall prescription volume over the past 12 months (ending April 2018). See More

The Ten Worst Medications to Take While Applying for Life Insurance

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 20, 2018

After practicing medicine for 20 years, I’ve become adept at “clarifying” to life insurance companies why patients are taking certain medications. The same medications appear to trigger red flags for both long-term care and life insurance companies.   

Their “concern” makes sense for some medications because they are used for serious chronic illnesses, but for others, the insurance companies are worried about your lifestyle. See More

Is Your Prescription Making You Tired?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - November 28, 2017

More than one in ten visits to a primary care doctor is for fatigue. Fatigue is composed of three major components: generalized weakness (difficulty in initiating activities), easy fatigability (difficulty in completing activities), and mental fatigue (difficulty with concentration and memory). While certainly not the only answer, medications may cause fatigue. Here are some of the common culprits.   

Beta Blockers

Beta-blockers wear many hats. See More

80+ Drugs to Be Dropped By Insurance in 2018

Elizabeth Davis - August 22, 2017

If you’ve got health insurance, now’s a good time to be paying attention. Each year, prescription coverage – the “formulary” – changes, and yours will likely be changing in 2018.

Express Scripts and Caremark, companies that handle pharmacy benefits for more than 200 million Americans, are removing more than 80 prescription medications from their formularies at the end of 2017. See More

These Prescriptions May Cause Ringing in the Ears

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 03, 2017

Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is a perception of sound in one or both ears in the absence of an external source. It’s often described by patients as buzzing, ringing, or whooshing. While there is often no known cause for tinnitus, there are a handful of medications that may contribute.

Medications that are known to cause tinnitus or hearing loss are considered “ototoxic medications. See More

10 Medications You Shouldn’t Mix With Alcohol

Dr. Sharon Orrange - April 04, 2017

“Can I have a drink while I’m taking my medication?” This is a question that primary care doctors are frequently asked, rightly so. Almost 50% of Americans report taking a prescription medication in the previous month. Alcohol in moderation (3 – 5 drinks per week) is recommended for stroke and heart disease prevention, and many folks taking medications known to interact with alcohol still report regular use. See More

10 Medications That are Dangerous to Stop Abruptly

Dr. Sharon Orrange - December 21, 2016

“Can I just stop my medication?” This question, frequently asked of primary care doctors, has a complicated answer. For starters, if you are taking a medication that is controlling an ongoing medical problem like high blood pressure, diabetes, or high cholesterol you should never stop it on your own—or your problem will return. Many patients do come clean though, and report that they just plain stopped their meds. See More

Dry Mouth: Are Your Medications to Blame?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - May 19, 2015

Dry mouth isn’t just an annoyance, it can lead to serious dental issues. Xerostomia is the medical term for dry mouth and when it happens, you’ll want to know what’s causing it.

Risk factors for dry mouth include medications, mouth breathing, older age, and a history of radiation therapy in cancer patients. Medical conditions that contribute to dry mouth include Sjögren’s syndrome, diabetes, and anxiety disorders, and these can be easily ruled out by your doctor. See More

Does Medical Marijuana Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse and Overdose?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 12, 2015

Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have now passed medical marijuana laws, and four more have pending legislation to legalize medical marijuana. Meanwhile, the use of prescription opioid medications (hydrocodone, oxycodone) has increased as the number of Americans with chronic non-cancer pain has increased. With that, we have seen in the United States the disturbing rise in prescription opioid abuse and overdose deaths. See More

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