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Pulmicort Coupon - Pulmicort 180mcg flexhaler

Budesonide

Pulmicort (budesonide) is used to treat the symptoms of asthma. Budesonide is less popular than other corticosteroids. It is available in brand and generic versions.

Check our savings tips for co-pay cards, assistance programs, and other ways to reduce your cost. Generic budesonide is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans

Pulmicort Coupon - Pulmicort 180mcg flexhaler

Savings Alert: We've added new, lower prices at most pharmacies for this prescription. Learn More

Pulmicort Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

10 Common Medications that Cause Joint Pain — from Cholesterol Drugs to Asthma Inhalers

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 18, 2018

Joint pain, back aches, and other musculoskeletal complaints are among the most prevalent health issues out there. When it comes to joint pain specifically (known as arthralgia), arthritis is the most common cause. But before you blame your achy joints on arthritis, did you know that everyday medications can cause joint pain too? Here are 10 common offenders.

1) Antibiotic — levofloxacin 

Levofloxacin (Levaquin) belongs to a group of antibiotics known as “fluoroquinolones” and is commonly prescribed for sinus infections and pneumonia. See More

Asthma Inhaler Arnuity Ellipta Now Approved for Young Children — Here’s How to Save

Tori Marsh - May 29, 2018

First approved in 2014 for patients 12 years of age and older, Arnuity Ellipta (fluticasone) is a popular inhaler used in the long-term management of asthma. Now, the inhaler can also be prescribed to younger children — as of May 2018, Arnuity Ellipta is FDA-approved for treating asthma in kids as young as 5 years old.

While this does expand treatment options for young children, Arnuity Ellipta is expensive and can be unaffordable for many. See More

How To Beat Expensive Asthma Inhalers: Budesonide Alternatives

Katie Mui - May 19, 2018

It’s no secret that asthma inhalers have gotten expensive, and there are no signs of soaring prices slowing down. Even under Medicare Part D, asthma inhalers are high-ticket drugs. They’re listed under Medicare’s higher-tier, “non-preferred” or “specialty” drug categories, which pushes the cost of these medications onto the 43 million Americans enrolled in Part D.

Whether or not you’re enrolled in Medicare, asthma inhalers can be pricey. See More

Here’s Why Asthma Inhalers Are So Expensive

Tori Marsh - April 18, 2018

In 2013, the New York Times published an expose on the high price of asthma inhalers, in an article headlined “The Soaring Cost of a Simple Breath.”

So what’s happened in the 5 years since? Prices have only gotten worse.

A GoodRx analysis of cash prices for asthma inhalers shows that prices have climbed about 35% since 2013, from an average price of around $280 in 2013 to more than $380 today.

The average cash price for one inhaler of Advair, a leading medication for asthma, increased from $316 in 2013 to $496 in 2018 – a 56% increase. See More

80+ Drugs to Be Dropped By Insurance in 2018

Elizabeth Davis - August 22, 2017

If you’ve got health insurance, now’s a good time to be paying attention. Each year, prescription coverage – the “formulary” – changes, and yours will likely be changing in 2018.

Express Scripts and Caremark, companies that handle pharmacy benefits for more than 200 million Americans, are removing more than 80 prescription medications from their formularies at the end of 2017. See More

Dropped by Insurance: Will Your Maintenance Inhaler Be Covered in 2015?

Roni Shye - October 30, 2014

As 2014 comes to a close, we should be thinking about what to expect for 2015. The start of a new year is a time for new challenges, new goals, and inevitably, a new prescription formulary.

What does this mean for you?

Express Scripts and Caremark have decided to remove certain asthma maintenance inhalers from their national preferred formulary and provided a list of covered alternatives. For more information and the full list of excluded drugs, see our post on the 2015 formulary changesSee More

Dry Powder Inhalers: Which One is Best for You?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 17, 2014

Half of patients with asthma or COPD aren’t using their inhalers properly. Inhaler mishandling has dire consequences—but inhalers are getting much better. With new ones hitting the market every month, you need to get to know them.

Does it matter if your inhaler is a Diskus, Turbohaler or Ellipta? These are all dry powder inhalers (DPIs) and they all use a dry powder formulation of an active drug. They are different than the classic metered dose inhalers like Proventil HFA or Proair HFASee More

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