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Proair Coupon - Proair 8.5g of 90mcg hfa inhaler

Proair (albuterol) is used to treat or prevent bronchospasm in patients with asthma, bronchitis, emphysema and other lung diseases. Proair is more popular than other short-acting beta agonists. There are currently no generic alternatives to Proair.

Check our savings tips for co-pay cards, assistance programs, and other ways to reduce your cost. Proair is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans.

Proair Coupon - Proair 8.5g of 90mcg hfa inhaler

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Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

10 Medications That Cause Shaky Hands – and How To Know It’s Not Parkinson’s

Dr. Sharon Orrange - August 09, 2018

My hands are shaking. Is it Parkinson’s? Something else? Shakiness, or tremors, is a common problem that brings patients to my office. If you start having shaky hands, you may worry that you have Parkinson’s disease, but many other things can cause tremors—like medications. The good news is, drug-induced tremors go away with lower doses or if you stop taking the medication.

Signs a medication may be causing your tremor

Medications can both cause tremors and make them worse. See More

Is Your Asthma Inhaler “Covered”, but Still Too Expensive? — Here’s How to Save

Tori Marsh - August 08, 2018

This year has been tough for people with asthma. Pollen season ran especially long and just weeks after it peaked, we now have the California wildfires spreading smoke to the majority of US states and causing a spike in symptom flare ups. On top of that, asthma inhalers today are expensive. Popular ones can cost upwards of $500 per month and many are inadequately covered by insurance plans.

So what’s going on with insurance coverage for these lifesaving medications and how can you save? First, high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) and restrictions on coverage are two ways insurance can leave you with a heavy bill. See More

Is Your Medication Making You Sweat? — 10 Drugs That Cause Excessive Sweating as a Side Effect

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 31, 2018

If you’ve noticed you are sweating more than usual—not just on your palms and soles, but all over—take a look at your medication list. The new occurrence of excess sweating everywhere on your body can be a result of many causes including diabetes, thyroid disease and infection, so it requires a careful evaluation by your doctor—but medications are a common offender.

It turns out, the human sweating response is influenced by a number of drugs. See More

Generic of Proair Asthma Inhaler Postponed, Again — Here’s How To Save Anyway

Tori Marsh - May 25, 2018

Proair is a common rescue inhaler used to treat asthma attacks, but it’s not cheap. Cash prices for one asthma inhaler average around $85. What’s more, since 2016, cash prices for Proair have increased by almost 70% — from $52 per inhaler to over $80 — and there’s still no generic available.

Even though it is expensive, Proair generally works well. Around 73% if people rate that Proair is worth it according to our friends at Iodine, and there are few side effects. See More

Prescriptions for Asthma Inhalers Surged 42% After NorCal Fires

Jeroen van Meijgaard - March 23, 2018

Prescriptions for asthma inhalers surged by over 40% in the San Francisco Bay Area in the month of last October’s Northern California fires in Napa and Sonoma counties, according to a GoodRx analysis of pharmacy data.

In Marin County, inhaler prescriptions climbed by 78% in Oct. 2017, with prescriptions in Napa rising by 67% and San Francisco, Sonoma, and Contra Costa climbing by about 50% in the month during the fires. See More

What Works for Cough?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 12, 2018

If you’re like everyone I’m seeing in the clinic these days, your cough may be keeping you up at night, and driving you and your coworkers crazy. Do any of the over-the-counter (OTC) or prescription medications really work for a cough? Let’s walk through it.

First, let’s go through the OTC cough suppressants

  • Acute cough due to viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) is the most common form of cough, and a ton of money is spent on prescription and non-prescription cough medications.
  •  See More

These Drugs Can Mess With Your Potassium

Dr. Sharon Orrange - October 17, 2017

It’s not being overly dramatic to say that abnormal levels of potassium may actually kill you. Serum (bloodstream) potassium is an electrolyte, and imbalances are called hyperkalemia (when too high) and hypokalemia (when too low). Cardiac arrhythmias are a known serious outcome of both hypo- and hyperkalemia, and national statistics indicate that almost half of 1% of emergency department visits and 2% of hospitalizations for high potassium end in death. See More

Administering Medications in School: 6 Tips For Parents

Roni Shye - October 03, 2017

If your child needs to use medication during the school year, making the proper accommodation with required school personnel is an important task for parents to complete at the beginning of the school year.

Here are some tips to help ensure that your child stays healthy during this school year.

Be up to date on the school’s policies and procedures

Every school will have different policies and procedures for students taking medication during school hours. See More

10 Albuterol Inhaler Side Effects to Watch Out For

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 20, 2017

Ventolin, Proair and Proventil are the albuterol inhalers commonly prescribed for people with asthma, reactive airway disease, or even for a persistent cough after an upper respiratory infection. Albuterol inhalers relax the muscles in the wall of the airways to improve wheezing and cough. Whether you’re prescribed a nebulizer or metered dose inhaler (MDI), albuterol is generally well tolerated—yet the same minor side effects are reported over and over againSee More

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