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Oxycodone Coupon - Oxycodone 5mg tablet

Generic Roxicodone

Oxycodone (Roxicodone) is a moderately priced drug used to treat moderate to severe pain. This drug is slightly more popular than comparable drugs. It is available in both generic and brand versions. Generic oxycodone is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but some pharmacy coupons or cash prices may be lower. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of oxycodone is around $14.52, 78% off the average retail price of $68.59. Compare opioids.
Oxycodone Coupon - Oxycodone 5mg tablet

Oxycodone Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

6 Non-Opioid Options for Pain Relief — and How To Choose the Best One for Your Pain

Marie Beaugureau - July 13, 2018

Opioids like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine have long been considered some of the most helpful drugs for managing acute pain. However, rates of opioid abuse and overdose deaths have skyrocketed in recent years. And now it turns out that there’s another reason to avoid opioids: they may not be the most effective treatment for pain relief after all.

Do opioids work better than other pain relievers?

Not necessarily. See More

Prescription Quantity Limits: What To Do When Insurance Plans Limit Your Coverage

Benita Lee - June 22, 2018

As with other forms of coverage restrictions, insurance plans use quantity limits to ensure patient safety and control healthcare costs. Quantity limits define how much of a drug you can fill during a specific time period, but they can be a hassle. Here’s how to navigate your plan’s policies, so you can still get the medications you need.

How do quantity limits work?

Generally speaking, plans will review clinical and FDA literature to decide how much of a drug they will cover in a certain time period. See More

8 Types of Medications That Can Cause Weight Gain As a Side Effect

Benita Lee - June 18, 2018

An unexpected increase in weight can be concerning for anyone. But it’s an unfortunate side effect of many common medications. Insulin, blood pressure medications, antidepressants, and even migraine medications can all cause weight gain, and some may even worsen the health conditions they’re trying to treat.

Sudden weight gain is never a reason to stop your medication without seeing your doctor first. See More

The Ten Worst Medications to Take While Applying for Life Insurance

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 20, 2018

After practicing medicine for 20 years, I’ve become adept at “clarifying” to life insurance companies why patients are taking certain medications. The same medications appear to trigger red flags for both long-term care and life insurance companies.   

Their “concern” makes sense for some medications because they are used for serious chronic illnesses, but for others, the insurance companies are worried about your lifestyle. See More

Is Your Prescription Making You Tired?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - November 28, 2017

More than one in ten visits to a primary care doctor is for fatigue. Fatigue is composed of three major components: generalized weakness (difficulty in initiating activities), easy fatigability (difficulty in completing activities), and mental fatigue (difficulty with concentration and memory). While certainly not the only answer, medications may cause fatigue. Here are some of the common culprits.   

Beta Blockers

Beta-blockers wear many hats. See More

10 Medications That are Dangerous to Stop Abruptly

Dr. Sharon Orrange - December 21, 2016

“Can I just stop my medication?” This question, frequently asked of primary care doctors, has a complicated answer. For starters, if you are taking a medication that is controlling an ongoing medical problem like high blood pressure, diabetes, or high cholesterol you should never stop it on your own—or your problem will return. Many patients do come clean though, and report that they just plain stopped their meds. See More

FDA Requires New Warning on Opioid Pain Medications

Roni Shye - June 15, 2016

The FDA has issued a new required warning for all opioid pain medications. If you are taking an opioid, you should be aware of a few potential side effects, including reactions with other medications, and effects on hormone levels.

What are some examples of opioid medications?

Opioids are powerful prescription-only medications, used to manage manage pain when other treatments may not work. Some common opiods include:

Why exactly was the FDA safety alert issued?

The FDA identified some safety concerns for anyone using opioid pain medications:

  • They can interact with many other medications
  • They can cause problems with a person’s adrenal glands
  • They can decrease sex hormone levels

What kind of medications can react with opioids?

Specifically, opioids may react with antidepressants and migraine medications. See More

Opioid Overdoses: How Do We Balance Help and Harm?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 04, 2016

Opioid pain medication is an emotional topic for everyone. Patients who struggle with chronic noncancer pain and need opioid medications feel they are portrayed as addicts when they ask for refills. Each week I see many patients using opioids for the appropriate reason, who have tried and failed with other medications and yet feel stigmatized by the use of medicine they need.

The flipside, however, is that more and more of us are dying from prescription pain medication overdoses, in addition to heroin overdoses when addicts move from Oxycontin to heroin. See More

Is Your Medication Making You Tired?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 10, 2014

One in ten visits to a primary care doctor is for fatigue. While certainly not the only cause, your medications can be the culprit for making you sleepy. Here are the players you need to know about.

Beta blockers. These are medications used for high blood pressure, migraine prevention, control of heart rate in atrial fibrillation, and they improve mortality after heart attack. Ok, now for the downside. They can make you sleepy. See More

Is Nucynta Better Than Other Pain Meds?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - April 23, 2014

One of the bright new changes in pain medications over the last few years were two medications: Ultram (tramadol) and now Nucynta (tapentadol). These are different from Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen), Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen), and Tylenol #3 (codeine/acetaminophen) in many ways and are considered much “gentler.” So, is Nucynta better? Lets look.

Ten points about Nucynta and Ultram you need to know:

  1. See More

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