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Naproxen Coupon - Naproxen 500mg tablet
NaproxenGeneric Naprosyn, Anaprox DS, Anaprox
NAPROXEN is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is used to reduce swelling and to treat pain. This medicine may be used for dental pain, headache, or painful monthly periods. It is also used for painful joint and muscular problems such as arthritis, tendinitis, bursitis, and gout. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of naproxen is around $7.64, 78% off the average retail price of $34.86. Compare NSAIDs.
Prescription Settings
naproxen(generic)
tablet
500mg
60 tablets
Naproxen Coupon - Naproxen 500mg tablet
naproxen(generic)
tablet
500mg
60 tablets

Naproxen Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Prescription Medications To Treat Endometriosis Pain – What Are the Current Options?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

Endometriosis is a common cause of painful periods, pelvic pain and infertility, affecting more than 11% of women in the US ages 15 to 44. Unfortunately, non-surgical treatments for endometriosis have been limited. In fact, the introduction of Orilissa in July marked the first time a new endometriosis drug has entered the market in nearly 10 years! Here’s what you should know about current treatment options. See More

25 Prescription Drugs That May Be Cheaper With GoodRx Than With Insurance

Thomas Goetz
Thomas Goetz -

If you believe the best way to pay for your prescription is with health insurance, you’re hardly alone. After all, that’s why we have insurance in the first place, and that’s what we expect insurance to do—to cover our healthcare expenses. So when we get to the pharmacy, we show our insurance card, fork over the copay, and move along.

But it turns out this may be costing us money. For many popular drugs—including lisinopril, levothyroxine, and prescription ibuprofen—insurance copays are often higher than what people would pay with a discount from GoodRx. See More

I Think I Have Gout – Now What?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

If you think you have gout, you’re not alone—joint pain is common and the prevalence of gout has increased over the past 30 years. Gout typically shows up as painful, red, hot, and swollen joint, usually in the lower extremities. 80% of gout involves a single joint (most often the big toe or knee), and attacks often occur at night or early in the morning.

Why is gout more common now? There are three reasons this is true: we are living longer, we have higher rates of obesity and other chronic diseases like diabetes, and we have higher rates of uncontrolled high blood pressure. See More

Switching From Brand to Generic Drugs Could Save $925 Million a Year, According to New Study

Benita Lee
Benita Lee -

How do you save on prescriptions? It might be in the way you pay for a prescription, like using a discount instead of insurance when it’s cheaper than your copay. Or it might be in the choice of your medication, like choosing a generic over a brand-name drug. Generics often give patients a way to save, but according to a new study, we might not be using them enough.

In the study, researchers looked at Medicare Part D spending on 29 brand-name combination drugs in 2016 and found that if generics had been used instead, spending could have been reduced by about $925 million. See More

Are NSAIDs Like Ibuprofen Bad for My Liver and Kidneys?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

It’s logical to wonder if a medication you often take for pain is safe. There are some concerns about the popular over-the-counter pain relievers known as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), which include ibuprofen (a.k.a. Motrin or Advil). Every week, I’m asked: How much can I take, and is it bad for my liver or kidneys?

How much ibuprofen can I take?

To treat mild to moderate pain, minor fever, and acute or chronic inflammation, 200 mg to 400 mg of ibuprofen will work. See More

6 Non-Opioid Options for Pain Relief — and How To Choose the Best One for Your Pain

Marie Beaugureau
Marie Beaugureau -

Opioids like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine have long been considered some of the most helpful drugs for managing acute pain. However, rates of opioid abuse and overdose deaths have skyrocketed in recent years. And now it turns out that there’s another reason to avoid opioids: they may not be the most effective treatment for pain relief after all.

Do opioids work better than other pain relievers?

Not necessarily. See More

The 5 Most Popular Over-the-Counter Pain Relievers: Are They Worth It?

Katie Mui
Katie Mui -

Have a headache or a pulled muscle? Odds are over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers like ibuprofen, aspirin or acetaminophen will do the trick. And unlike prescription pain medications containing opioids, OTC painkillers aren’t habit-forming, and likely won’t leave you groggy, dizzy, or even constipated. They’re also cheap and easy to find. All pharmacies carry both brand-name and generic varieties, which are generally cheaper and work just as wellSee More

The 3 Most Common Causes of Drug Allergies — and How To Treat Them

Benita Lee
Benita Lee -

Has your doctor ever asked if you’re allergic to any drugs? Luckily for most people, medicine allergies are not that common. But for the few who do have them, allergic reactions can be extremely dangerous. Here’s what you need to know about drug allergies before you start a new medication.

What are drug allergies?

When we talk about allergic reactions to drugs, we’re not talking about side effects. Side effects are the known common risks listed on the drug’s labeling. See More

Lyrica vs. Gabapentin: Which is Better for Sciatica Pain?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

Sciatica — the pain that travels from your low back down your leg — is extremely common. It affects up to 40% of adults, but there’s a lot of conflicting information out there on which medications work best to relieve pain. Lyrica (pregabalin), Neurontin (gabapentin), and Neurontin + Elavil (amitriptyline) are all popular pain relievers, but here’s what research says about which ones actually work.

Sciatica is the term for pain radiating from the low back down the back/side of your leg, sometimes with tingling. See More

Medications That Can Raise Your Blood Pressure

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

With new guidelines issued by the American Heart Association, the goal blood pressure for all adults is now less than 130/80. The first number of your blood pressure, 130, is the systolic blood pressure and the second number, 80, is diastolic.

It is estimated almost half of Americans may meet the criteria for high blood pressure (BP), which can increase the risk for serious adverse cardiovascular events. See More

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GoodRx is not sponsored by or affiliated with any of the pharmacies identified in its price comparisons. All trademarks, brands, logos and copyright images are property of their respective owners and rights holders and are used solely to represent the products of these rights holders. This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. GoodRx is not offering advice, recommending or endorsing any specific prescription drug, pharmacy or other information on the site. GoodRx provides no warranty for any of the pricing data or other information. Please seek medical advice before starting, changing or terminating any medical treatment.
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