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Motrin Coupon - Motrin 400mg tablet

Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen is an NSAID used to treat fever and pain from arthritis, menstrual cramps, and muscular aches. It works by reducing inflammation. Ibuprofen is a generic medication, and is available both over-the-counter and by prescription depending on the strength. Prescription Motrin had the same active ingredient, but has been discontinued. Over-the-counter brands include Advil and Motrin IB. Ibuprofen should be used only when needed as it may increase risk of stroke or heart attack and long term use can cause stomach bleeding and ulcers. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of ibuprofen is around $7.14, 81% off the average retail price of $39.29. Compare NSAIDs.
Motrin Coupon - Motrin 400mg tablet

Motrin Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Prescriptions for Allergy Medications Surge: GoodRx Monthly Report

Tori Marsh - April 05, 2018

Spring is officially here – and that means seasonal allergies have arrived. Prescriptions for allergy medications rose sharply in March, according to a GoodRx analysis of a nationally representative sample of US prescription fills, with some interesting patterns in state-by-state trends.

Our monthly GoodRx Index report also showed other drug trends for March:

Medications That Can Raise Your Blood Pressure

Dr. Sharon Orrange - April 02, 2018

With new guidelines issued by the American Heart Association, the goal blood pressure for all adults is now less than 130/80. The first number of your blood pressure, 130, is the systolic blood pressure and the second number, 80, is diastolic.

It is estimated almost half of Americans may meet the criteria for high blood pressure (BP), which can increase the risk for serious adverse cardiovascular events. See More

Ibuprofen or Meloxicam. What’s Better?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - March 06, 2018

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the treatment of acute pain and chronic inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases. However, there can be a downfall to long-term use of NSAIDS – they can increase the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications such as ulcers and bleeding. There are some NSAIDS, known as “partially selective NSAIDS,” that are known to result in fewer GI effects while still having the same effectiveness. See More

Everyday Medications People Are Allergic To

Katie Mui - February 22, 2018

“Are you allergic to any medications?”

This is something your doctor will ask you as they reach for their prescription pad. It’s also a question that most people breeze over unless they’ve experienced an adverse reaction to a drug before. Otherwise, it’s hard to know what to look out for.   

An allergy to a drug is different from its side effects, which are the known common reactions listed on the drug label. See More

Do You Have Asthma? These Medications Could Be Making It Worse

Roni Shye - February 07, 2018

The number of people who have asthma continues to grow – an estimated 24.6 million Americans are currently suffering from the disease. Things that can trigger asthma include allergies, exercise, acid reflux, and irritants like smoke or perfumes. But did you know that prescription and over-the-counter medications can also cause problems with asthma?

Here are some medications that can make your asthma worse, or even cause an asthma attack. See More

Here’s What You Need To Know About Your Meds If You’re 65 Or Older

Katie Mui - February 06, 2018

As we get older, our bodies start turning on us. Our blood pressure begins to rise, joints develop arthritis, and arteries start clogging up. We end up taking more and more medications. Some 90% of people over the age of 65 take at least one medication per week, and 40% take five or more. 1 in 6 people in this age group will inevitably experience a harmful side effect of a drug they are taking regularly. See More

Should You Treat A Fever?

Katie Mui - January 10, 2018

Fevers – can’t live with them, can’t live without them. Or at least, that’s the case once you start coming down with one. Understanding what happens inside your body when you have a fever may help you determine whether to treat yours or not.

How a fever works

It seems counterintuitive that you get the shivers when you’re feeling feverish. You’re hot, but you’re also cold? But it all starts to make sense if you take a look at what’s really going on inside. See More

Are You Taking Too Much Tylenol Without Knowing It?

Katie Mui - December 13, 2017

Pretty much everyone experiences pain at some point in their lives. Sometimes it’s just a headache or a minor injury or brief illness — but for many, pain involves more chronic issues such as arthritis or back pain.

Many medications can help manage pain, with the best known being over the counter pain relievers like Motrin (ibuprofen), Aleve (naproxen), or Tylenol (acetaminophen). These drugs (except Tylenol) — known as NSAIDs, short for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs — work remarkably well for a variety of conditions. See More

Why Do Some Medications Come As Pills, And Others As Injections?

Katie Mui - November 22, 2017

Why do some medications come in tablets and others in capsules? Why are there ointments and creams? And why are some drugs delivered by injection or through an intravenous (IV) drip?   

Like a lot of things in medicine, the answer can get complicated, but it boils down to this: where a drug needs to be, how quickly it needs to get there, and how long it needs to hang around. After a major surgery, your doctor could prescribe a powerful painkiller by IV drip, which gets the drug circulating right away, and to pain receptors throughout your body. See More

6 Alternatives to Opioids for Pain

Marie Beaugureau - November 16, 2017

Prescription opioids like oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, and morphine have long been considered some of the most helpful drugs for managing acute pain, where the body is immediately reacting to trauma or injury. Each year, over 200 million opioid prescriptions are given out in the United States.

Unfortunately, the rates of opioid abuse and overdose deaths have skyrocketed in recent years, leading healthcare providers and patients alike to be cautious about the use of opioids. See More

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