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Loratadine Coupon - Loratadine 24 hour tablet
LoratadineGeneric Claritin
Loratadine is an antihistamine used to treat seasonal allergies. It works by blocking the action of histamine which causes allergic symptoms. Brand name loratadine is called Claritin, also available over the counter. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of loratadine is around $4.22, 67% off the average retail price of $12.95. Compare antihistamines.
Prescription Settings
generic
tablet
24 hour
30 tablets
Loratadine Coupon - Loratadine 24 hour tablet
loratadine(generic)
tablet
24 hour
30 tablets
Savings Alert: Loratadine is available over-the-counter. You can use GoodRx coupons to save, but you will need to present a doctor’s prescription and purchase at the pharmacy counter. Learn More

Loratadine Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Packing for Allergies: 8 Essential Tips for Travelling with Allergy Symptoms

Benita Lee
Benita Lee -

Summer’s in full swing — complete with barbeques and beach parties, airplane rides and hotels. And that means lots of potential allergens. Whether you’re stay-cationing or vacationing, we’ve put together this packing checklist to help you plan for allergies so they don’t ruin your fun.

1) Pack allergy medications

Refill prescriptions and/or over-the-counter medications for allergy symptoms like sinus pain and pressure. See More

Which Allergy Nasal Sprays Are Safe To Use During Pregnancy?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

Nasal allergy sprays treat stuffy noses and itchy eyes related to allergies. If you’re pregnant though, you may wonder if they’re safe to use. Recent studies have shown us that nasal steroid sprays are safe to use during pregnancy for mild to moderate allergy symptoms. However, not all nasal sprays are safe during pregnancy. Here’s what you need to know.

How do we know nasal steroid sprays are safe during pregnancy?

Commonly used steroid nasal sprays (also called intranasal glucocorticoid sprays) include Flonase (fluticasone propionate), Nasacort AQ (triamcinolone), Nasonex (mometasone), Omnaris (ciclesonide), Rhinocort Aqua (budesonide) and Veramyst (fluticasone furoate). See More

Monistat vs. Diflucan (Fluconazole): Which is Better for a Yeast Infection?

Katie Mui
Katie Mui -

Yeast infections are caused by Candida albicans, a type of fungus that is naturally found in the vaginal flora of most women. However, too much of a good thing can be bad, and overgrowth of Candida leads to a common condition for women called a yeast infection. Telltale signs include itching, soreness, and a white, thick discharge with little odor.

Given how unpleasant these symptoms can be, it’s no surprise that women are eager to skip the doctor’s visit and reach for over-the-counter (OTC) products for quick relief. See More

7 Medications That Cause Nightmares and Disturbing Dreams

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

Antidepressants, blood pressure drugs, and allergy medicines are some of the many popular medications that can affect your dreams, and not always in a good way.

Medications that influence the neurotransmitters in our brain — those same chemicals that affect our mood and alertness — often come with the reported side effect of causing disturbing dreams and nightmares. While nightmares occur in only 1–5% of folks using these medications, here is the list of the most common offenders. See More

New Study Finds that Some Drugs May Raise Dementia Risk — as Many as 20 Years Later

Tori Marsh
Tori Marsh -

Turns out, taking a certain kind of drug today is associated with an increased chance of dementia as many as 20 years from now, according to a new study.

The study looked at people who had taken anticholinergic drugs that are frequently prescribed for depression, urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, asthma, Parkinson’s disease, and allergies. People who had taken drugs from specific classes of anticholinergics had as much as a 30% greater likelihood of being diagnosed with dementia later in life. See More

Should I Use a Z-Pak for Sinus Infections?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

“Can I get a Z-Pak?” is a question asked every day by our patients struggling with an upper respiratory infection. Trust me, I want to help you get better, but that’s not always the way to do it.

What is the Z-Pak used to treat?

The Z-Pak (Zithromax), is a five-day course of the antibiotic, azithromycin. It’s used to treat certain bacterial infections, including some sinus infections and upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) that lead to headaches, congestion, and runny noses. See More

Prices for Diabetes Medications Continue To Surge: GoodRx Monthly Report

Tori Marsh
Tori Marsh -

Diabetes has become one of America’s most expensive diseases, costing the average patient almost $17,000 per year. A majority of that expense is due to the cost of diabetes medications – which are only getting more expensive. Recent data from the GoodRx Index reveals that diabetes medications continue to surge each month.

The monthly GoodRx Index report also showed these drug trends for April:

  • Prices for brand-name drugs are on the rise.
  • See More

Why 2018 Is a Bad Year for Allergies – and Could Get Worse

Tori Marsh
Tori Marsh -

In what appears to an abnormally bad year for seasonal allergies, rates for allergy medication fills are exceeding the last four years by 13%, with some significant geographic variations across the US.

Prescriptions are notably higher in the West and the South, with a 19% increase of fills in the West and a 16% rise in the South. Prescription volumes in the Northeast and the Midwest remain in line with past years – but trends indicate that things could get worse. See More

I Just Found Out I’m Pregnant – What’s Next?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

You just took a urine pregnancy test and it’s positive, what should you do now? As a primary care doctor, many patients contact me before they’ve picked out an OB/GYN. The news of a positive test is an exciting time that often sends patients into a panic about what they should and shouldn’t be doing.

Here are the questions I’m asked all the time.

My urine test was positive. Do I need a blood test?

Generally, the urine tests are accurate enough to eliminate the need for a blood test. See More

Is Your Prescription Making You Tired?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

More than one in ten visits to a primary care doctor is for fatigue. Fatigue is composed of three major components: generalized weakness (difficulty in initiating activities), easy fatigability (difficulty in completing activities), and mental fatigue (difficulty with concentration and memory). While certainly not the only answer, medications may cause fatigue. Here are some of the common culprits.   

Beta Blockers

Beta-blockers wear many hats. See More

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