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Liraglutide Coupon - Liraglutide 3 pens of 18mg/3ml carton
Liraglutide

Victoza

Liraglutide (Victoza) is an expensive drug used to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. This drug is more popular than comparable drugs. There are currently no generic alternatives to Victoza. It is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but some pharmacy coupons or cash prices may be lower. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of Victoza is around $809.57, 18% off the average retail price of $990.52. Compare GLP-1 agonists.
Liraglutide Coupon - Liraglutide 3 pens of 18mg/3ml carton

Liraglutide Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Why Taking Your Medications for These Common “Silent” Diseases is Important

The GoodRx Pharmacist - January 16, 2018

If you’ve ever been afraid to show up at your doctor’s office because you’ve been “bad” then this post is for YOU!  You may think your doctor is “pushing medications on you” especially if you aren’t experiencing any symptoms of the condition they are treating you for. However, their reasoning is not without sound medical and professional judgment. 

One of the many reasons you might receive a lecture about the importance of taking your medications is due to the progressive nature of many diseases if not properly treated. See More

New Recommendations for All Type 2 Diabetics

Dr. Sharon Orrange - January 16, 2018

Just recently, the American Diabetes Association updated their guidelines to include the recommendation that certain Type 2 Diabetics add to their regimen one of two medications shown to lower the risk of death from stroke and heart disease. Here is the update:   

If you are a type 2 diabetic with established heart disease, aka atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and your target blood sugars aren’t being met with metformin and diet/exercise add Victoza injections 0r Jardiance. See More

New FDA Approval for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

The GoodRx Pharmacist - December 27, 2017

Not all injectable diabetes medications contain insulin.  A newer class of medications used for people with type 2 diabetes are considered non-insulin injectables and include drugs like Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon, and Trulicity.

Recently the FDA approved, Ozempic, a new non-insulin injectable for people with type 2 diabetes.

What is Ozempic indicated for?

Ozempic is a medication to be used in addition to a healthy diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. See More

Could Your Diabetes Injection Soon Be Available in Pill Form?

The GoodRx Pharmacist - November 28, 2017

New medications used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes are popping up left and right. From 2013-2016 there have been 15 new oral and injectable medications approved for the treatment of diabetes alone.   

One new class of medications that you might have seen are GLP-1 agonists. This class includes injection drugs like Byetta, Victoza, and Trulicity to name a few.

What’s noteworthy about this class? There’s a possibility that we might see some oral GLP-1 inhibitors soon! This could mean no more painful injections. See More

Adlyxin for Diabetes Type 2 Now Available in Pharmacies

The GoodRx Pharmacist - May 31, 2017

Back in July, the FDA approved Adlyxin for diabetes type 2, and it is now available in pharmacies!

When people think about injectable diabetes medications, the first thing that comes to mind tends to be insulin medications like Humalog (insulin lispro) or Lantus (insulin glargine). However, the FDA has been approving many new non-insulin products recently, like Victoza and Byetta, and now Adlyxin!

What is Adlyxin indicated for?

Adlyxin is a GLP-1 agonist, a hormone that helps stimulate the production of insulin and normalize blood sugar levels. See More

FDA Approves Soliqua for Type 2 Diabetes

The GoodRx Pharmacist - December 13, 2016

As 2016 comes to a close, we have some news in the world of diabetes medications! The FDA has recently released Soliqua 100/33, a combination medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes can be very tricky and hard to control. Therefore, the discovery and approval of these new oral and injectable medications are important for healthcare providers and their patients.

What is Soliqua 100/33 indicated for?

Soliqua 100/33 is prescribed to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes, in conjunction with diet and exercise. See More

6 Reasons You Should Talk to Your Doctor About Victoza

Dr. Sharon Orrange - September 12, 2016

The American Diabetes Association recommends that metformin be your first line choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, if you are on the maximum dose of metformin, or can’t tolerate it, there are many other great alternatives that you may not know of—like Victoza (liraglutide).

Victoza is a brand only medication, given once daily as a subcutaneous injection, and is a great option for overweight type 2 diabetics. See More

How Can I Reverse Fatty Liver Disease?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - September 06, 2016

Fatty liver disease is now the most common cause of abnormal liver blood tests in the United States. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, is often discovered during a visit to your doctor, with the news that your “liver function blood tests” are abnormal. After being told your AST and ALT blood tests are abnormal you may have a liver ultrasound to confirm fatty liver changes.

NAFLD can lead to cirrhosis—chronic liver damage, that can lead to liver failure—so here are 10 ways to reverse fatty liver. See More

5 Ways to Save More on Your Diabetes Meds

Dr. Sharon Orrange - October 06, 2015

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes. That’s more than 10% of the US—and that number continues to rise. More than 1.7 million adults were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012 alone.
Fortunately, several new medications for diabetes have recently been approved—Toujeo (a new insulin product), Synjardy (a new combination of empagliflozin/metformin) and others. These new drugs provide several benefits such as fewer side effects or foolproof self-dosing with an insulin pen. See More

How Long Should You Keep Insulin Pens?

The GoodRx Pharmacist - May 05, 2015

Did you read our blog on insulin vials and think to yourself, does this apply to my insulin pens too? If so, this post is for you!

With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard keep track of how long each of these pens stays good.

Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your pen at the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your pen regardless of whether you have any leftover. See More

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