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Lantus (insulin glargine) is an expensive, long-acting type of insulin. Insulin helps to control blood sugar levels in diabetes mellitus, including diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. It is more popular than comparable drugs. There are currently no generic alternatives for any insulin brand. It is not covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but manufacturer and pharmacy coupons can help offset the cost. Compare insulins.
Lantus Coupon - Lantus 5 solostar pens of 3ml carton
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Lantus Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

40+ Drugs to Be Dropped By Insurance

Elizabeth Davis - August 17, 2016

Americans, get ready for sticker shock at the pharmacy.

In 2017, the nation’s largest insurance companies will likely exclude up to 154 different drugs from coverage. If you’re taking one of these prescriptions, your co-pay is about to go way, way up.

Last year, popular drugs including Viagra and Qsymia were dropped by major insurance plans for 2016. The trend continues this year. Almost 50 popular brand-name and generic drugs will likely no longer be covered by one of the nation’s largest prescription insurance providers. See More

This Class of Drugs Causes Almost 100,000 Annual Emergency Visits

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 07, 2016

Insulin: legal, widely used, and transforms lives. But there are risks—soon you’ll see why we try to spare our type II diabetics from having to start insulin. Using oral medications to their maximum dose and incorporating diet and lifestyle changes is the way to go before resorting to insulin.

Of course, tight blood sugar control is the goal for reducing diabetes related complications (kidney disease, eye disease, neuropathy) but insulin remains one of the most challenging aspects of diabetes management given the risks. See More

Is Newly Approved Tresiba the Best Long-Acting Insulin?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - March 03, 2016

Comparing long-acting insulins? Newly approved Tresiba may come out ahead. With the exception of NPH insulin (the original long-acting insulin—examples include Humulin N and Novolin N), they are all going to cost you. So, if you are already paying big bucks for your long-acting insulin, here are some things to think about:

What does a long-acting or basal insulin do for me? This is your baseline insulin, the insulin that is secreted to control your sugars when you are not eating (in the fasting state). See More

New Insulin Basaglar in Pharmacies This Year

The GoodRx Pharmacist - February 17, 2016

Basaglar (insulin glargine) is the newest brand of long-acting insulin to hit the market. It shares its active ingredient (insulin glargine) with Lantus, but is not a generic equivalent and the two can’t be substituted for each other.

Long-acting insulin like Basaglar (also sometimes referred to as basal insulin) are used to keep blood glucose levels stable throughout the day.

There are now four long-acting insulins approved by the FDA: Lantus, Levemir (insulin detemir), Toujeo (insulin glargine recombinant), Tresiba (insulin degludec), and BasaglarSee More

New Diabetes Supply Prices Now on GoodRx

Elizabeth Davis - November 23, 2015

You can now find and compare diabetes supplies on GoodRx! Do a search now to see prices for glucose test strips and meters, control solution, syringes and lancets, and more.

As you may already know, shopping around online will typically get you a lower price than what you’ll find walking in to your local pharmacy.

To make it even easier to get the most savings, you can now order discounted supplies directly from Total Diabetes Supply—in addition to the low Amazon. See More

FDA Approval: First New Long-Acting Insulins in 10 Years

The GoodRx Pharmacist - October 23, 2015

There have been several new insulin products approved over the past year, including Toujeo, Humalog U-200, Afrezza—and now Tresiba and Ryzodeg.

The other recent insulin approvals are what I like to call spin-off insulin products. For example, Toujeo has the same type of insulin as Lantus (insulin glargine), but is more concentrated. Humalog U-200 is the same exact product as Humalog U-100 (insulin lispro), but once again, more concentrated. See More

5 Ways to Save More on Your Diabetes Meds

Dr. Sharon Orrange - October 06, 2015

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes. That’s more than 10% of the US—and that number continues to rise. More than 1.7 million adults were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012 alone.
Fortunately, several new medications for diabetes have recently been approved—Toujeo (a new insulin product), Synjardy (a new combination of empagliflozin/metformin) and others. These new drugs provide several benefits such as fewer side effects or foolproof self-dosing with an insulin pen. See More

Should My Insulin Dose Be Lower? Toujeo vs Lantus

The GoodRx Pharmacist - August 18, 2015

Early in 2015 the FDA approved the first concentrated long-acting insulin known as Toujeo (insulin glargine), and it’s now available in pharmacies.

While Toujeo is the first of its kind, the key word is “concentrated.” It actually contains the same active ingredient (insulin glargine) as Lantus—which is currently the #1 prescribed insulin in the US.

To make things even more confusing: Toujeo comes in a 300 mg/mL dosage, while Lantus is 100 mg/mL. See More

How Long Should You Keep Insulin Pens?

The GoodRx Pharmacist - May 05, 2015

Did you read our blog on insulin vials and think to yourself, does this apply to my insulin pens too? If so, this post is for you!

With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard keep track of how long each of these pens stays good.

Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your pen at the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your pen regardless of whether you have any leftover. See More

How Long Should You Keep Your Open Insulin Vials?

The GoodRx Pharmacist - April 29, 2015

With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard to keep track of when your vial should be tossed.

Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your vial by the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your vial regardless of whether you have any leftover. See More

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