Hypertension Savings Tips

Savings Tips for Hypertension

Get the latest updates on this condition from the GoodRx medical team.

  • What’s the Best Beta Blocker for Heart Failure?

    March 29, 2016

    Beta blockers save lives after heart attack and improve mortality for heart failure patients. They also work well to control blood pressure. Carvedilol (Coreg was the brand name) has been known as the “heart failure beta blocker”—but now it appears that metoprolol (Lopressor) may share that title.

    Many of my patients are asking: which is better? Let’s look at the recent evidence.

    What’s the difference between carvedilol and metoprolol?
    Carvedilol is known as a “non-selective beta blocker” meaning it blocks all beta receptors throughout the body. See More

  • GoodRx Top 10 Drug Guide: What Are the Most Expensive and Most Popular Drugs in the US

    January 28, 2016

    The new Goodrx Top 10 Lists are in, and this time we take a look back at the end of 2015. These are the most popular and most expensive drugs in the US, and they cover all kinds of conditions from common heart and pain meds to pricey treatments for cancer and genetic disorders.

    To start with—which drugs were filled the most in the last quarter of 2015?

  • Recall: Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) Capsules

    November 10, 2015

    Generic manufacturer American Health Packaging has issued a voluntary recall of two lots of hydrochlorothiazide, a diuretic (sometimes known as a “water pill”) used to treat water retention or high blood pressure.

    This is a class II recall, the most common type of recall, which means that there is a situation where use of the recalled medication may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences, but the likelihood of serious adverse effects is small. See More

  • Recall: Generic Lisinopril for High Blood Pressure

    July 29, 2015

    Manufacturer Wockhardt has issued a voluntary recall of four lots of generic lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), an ACE inhibitor used to help lower blood pressure and treat heart failure.

    This is a class II recall, the most common type of recall, which means that there is a situation where use of the recalled medication may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences, but the likelihood of serious adverse effects is small. See More

  • 8 Reasons to Get a Standing Desk

    April 16, 2015

    Sitting is bad, you knew that—but recent studies have confirmed that prolonged sitting is a risk factor for chronic disease. This includes heart disease, which cost the US almost $109 billion in 2010 alone according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), including medications and other health care.

    What has also been revealed is that physical activity outside of work doesn’t take away all the ill effects of sitting. See More

  • Seven Uses for Spironolactone: Skin, Hair, and Heart

    April 07, 2015

    For a really cheap and safe medication, spironolactone has many uses. From heart health to hair growth this potassium-sparing diuretic is safe and effective.

    How does spironolactone work for so many conditions? When it comes to the heart, lowering blood pressure, and helping relieve edema, spironolactone works by competing with aldosterone for receptor sites in the kidneys—which increases sodium and water removal while conserving potassium. See More

  • Is Coffee Bad for You?

    January 22, 2015

    Is drinking coffee bad for me? For a drink as popular as coffee, its physiologic effects are something you should learn about. You will be reassured I’m sure.

    The Good

    Maintaining alertness is a well-known benefit and what most of us rely on caffeine for. But what else? Every day my patients ask me if coffee is bad for their heart. In addition to caffeine coffee contains polyphenols which are dietary antioxidants. See More

  • Valsartan Too Expensive? See If You Can Switch to a Cheaper Option

    November 11, 2014

    If you’ve been on Diovan or the generic version valsartan, and are being told by your insurance it will no longer be covered—you need a plan. Can you switch to losartan (Cozaar) or another medication to save money?

    Though valsartan is the generic version of Diovan it’s still expensive. Both valsartan and losartan are ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers); out of the ARBs, losartan has been around the longest.

    Here are some simple things to know if you’ve been told to switch your ARB to losartan:

    • The benefits of losartan include controlling blood pressure, slowing the progression of diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy), and decreasing stroke risk in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.
    •  See More
  • 40+ Brand-Name Drugs Dropped By Insurance in 2015

    August 20, 2014

    For many Americans with health insurance, more than 40 popular brand-name drugs may no longer be covered starting in January 2015. Express Scripts and Caremark, companies that handle pharmacy benefits for more than 200 million Americans, are removing over 40 drugs from their formularies at the end of 2014. This is in addition to the more than 50 drugs removed last year.

    What are Express Scripts and Caremark?

    Express Scripts and Caremark are companies that administer prescription drug benefits for many health insurance companies and Tricare. See More

  • ACE Inhibitors vs ARBs: What’s the Difference?

    July 31, 2014

    ACE Inhibitors and ARBS – these abbreviations may not look all that similar or even have any meaning to you as a patient. However, 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure and are likely on one of these two types of medication even if they do not know it. Drugs in these classes have the same main indication, hypertension (high blood pressure), but differ in how they work and their side effects. See More

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