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Hydrocodone / Acetaminophen Coupon - Hydrocodone / Acetaminophen 5mg/325mg tablet
FDA Update

Generic Lortab, Maxidone, Vicodin, Norco, Xodol, Hycet

Hydrocodone/acetaminophen (Vicodin, Lorcet, Lortab, Norco, Xodol, Hycet) is inexpensive drug used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is more popular than comparable drugs. It is available in multiple generic and brand versions. Generic hydrocodone/acetaminophen is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but some pharmacy coupons or cash prices may be lower. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of hydrocodone / acetaminophen is around $14.70, 71% off the average retail price of $52.39. Compare opioid / acetaminophen combinations.

Hydrocodone / Acetaminophen Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

10 Most Common Drug Combinations

Tori Marsh - November 07, 2017

Did you know that nearly 7 in 10 Americans take a prescription drug, and about 50% of Americans take at least two? In many cases, taking more than one drug is necessary to cure an ailment, treat symptoms, or control a chronic disease. But in others, multiple drugs may not mix well in your body, and in your pocketbook.

We’ve compiled a list of drugs commonly taken together. We’ll tell you more about why these drugs are taken together, and which ones work. See More

10 Medications You Shouldn’t Mix With Alcohol

Dr. Sharon Orrange - April 04, 2017

“Can I have a drink while I’m taking my medication?” This is a question that primary care doctors are frequently asked, rightly so. Almost 50% of Americans report taking a prescription medication in the previous month. Alcohol in moderation (3 – 5 drinks per week) is recommended for stroke and heart disease prevention, and many folks taking medications known to interact with alcohol still report regular use. See More

10 Medications It’s Dangerous to Stop Abruptly

Dr. Sharon Orrange - December 21, 2016

“Can I just stop my medication?” This question, frequently asked of primary care doctors, has a complicated answer. For starters, if you are taking a medication that is controlling an ongoing medical problem like high blood pressure, diabetes, or high cholesterol you should never stop it on your own—or your problem will return. Many patients do come clean though, and report that they just plain stopped their meds. See More

Who Gets Hooked on Opioids After Surgery?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - September 02, 2016

Many patients report becoming hooked on their opioid medications (like Vicodin, Percocet, Dilaudid, hydrocodone, and so on) after doctors prescribed them for postoperative pain.

If you’ve never used pain medications and are given them for pain after a procedure, who is most likely to have a problem down the line? Well, a recent JAMA study evaluated the risk for chronic opioid use following several common surgical procedures in opioid-naive patients (people who have never used opioid medications before). See More

FDA Requires New Warning on Opioid Pain Medications

The GoodRx Pharmacist - June 15, 2016

The FDA has issued a new required warning for all opioid pain medications. If you are taking an opioid, you should be aware of a few potential side effects, including reactions with other medications, and effects on hormone levels.

What are some examples of opioid medications?

Opioids are powerful prescription-only medications, used to manage manage pain when other treatments may not work. Some common opiods include:

Why exactly was the FDA safety alert issued?

The FDA identified some safety concerns for anyone using opioid pain medications:

  • They can interact with many other medications
  • They can cause problems with a person’s adrenal glands
  • They can decrease sex hormone levels

What kind of medications can react with opioids?

Specifically, opioids may react with antidepressants and migraine medications. See More

7 Secrets to Easy Pharmacy Transfers

The GoodRx Pharmacist - February 18, 2016

So you’ve used GoodRx to compare prices on your prescription, and you found a less expensive pharmacy. But transferring your prescription is a pain, right? It’s actually easier than you may think! Generally, your new pharmacy will want to make the transfer as smooth as possible—and there are a few things you can to do keep things simple:

  1. Let your new pharmacy know that you want to transfer your prescriptions from your old pharmacy.
  2.  See More

Opioid Overdoses: How Do We Balance Help and Harm?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 04, 2016

Opioid pain medication is an emotional topic for everyone. Patients who struggle with chronic noncancer pain and need opioid medications feel they are portrayed as addicts when they ask for refills. Each week I see many patients using opioids for the appropriate reason, who have tried and failed with other medications and yet feel stigmatized by the use of medicine they need.

The flipside, however, is that more and more of us are dying from prescription pain medication overdoses, in addition to heroin overdoses when addicts move from Oxycontin to heroin. See More

New GoodRx Top 10 Drug Guide

Elizabeth Davis - June 05, 2015

Our new top 10 lists are in for the most-dispensed and most expensive prescriptions in the US—take a look at these interesting updates.

Which prescriptions have been filled the most in 2015 so far?

Based on a sample of claims reported by pharmacies across the country, thyroid meds like Synthroid and levothyroxine near the top of the list, while standard heart and diabetes prescriptions lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), atorvastatin (Lipitor), and metformin (Glucophage) are still very frequently prescribed—no surprises there. See More

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