Advertisement

Humalog (insulin lispro) is a short-acting type of insulin. Insulin helps to control blood sugar levels in diabetes mellitus, including diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. Humalog is more popular than other insulins. There are currently no generic options for any insulin brand, but less expensive biosimilar versions may be available in the future.

Check our savings tips for co-pay cards, assistance programs, and other ways to reduce your cost. Humalog is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans.

Savings Alert: We've added new, lower prices at most pharmacies for this prescription. Learn More

Humalog Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Here’s Why Insulin Is So Expensive – And What You Can Do About It

Marie Beaugureau - February 08, 2018

The numbers are in: U.S. spending on diabetes drugs increased from $10 billion to $22 billion per year between 2002 and 2012, according to a recent study. And most of that cost was due to skyrocketing prices for one diabetes medication: insulin. Take, for example, Lantus, one of the most popular insulins on the market. The price of a 10-milliliter vial has shot up from under $40 in 2001 to around $275 today. See More

Why is Humalog Expensive? And How Can You Save?

Tori Marsh - January 17, 2018

Humalog (insulin lispro) is a fast-acting insulin used to treat diabetes type one and two. Doctors report low levels of adherence to insulins like Humalog because of its cost. Cash prices for Humalog average around $549 for five kwikpens, and there is no generic alternative for any insulin brand. Humalog generated billions of dollars in global sales for Eli Lilly in 2016.

Here is some information on Humalog, and how you can save. See More

Why Taking Your Medications for These Common “Silent” Diseases is Important

Roni Shye - January 16, 2018

If you’ve ever been afraid to show up at your doctor’s office because you’ve been “bad” then this post is for YOU!  You may think your doctor is “pushing medications on you” especially if you aren’t experiencing any symptoms of the condition they are treating you for. However, their reasoning is not without sound medical and professional judgment. 

One of the many reasons you might receive a lecture about the importance of taking your medications is due to the progressive nature of many diseases if not properly treated. See More

Fast-Acting Insulin Fiasp Now Available

Roni Shye - November 22, 2017

Mealtime insulins, or fast-acting insulins, are injected before or after each meal to regulate the blood sugar. Type 1 diabetics require mealtime insulin injections as their pancreas does not produce insulin, whereas type 2 diabetics may only require mealtime insulin if they struggle with blood sugar control after meals or are not achieving their target A1C.     

Common fast acting insulins include Humalog and Novologand we have another to add to the list. See More

Rapid-Acting Versus Long-Acting Insulin: What’s the Difference?

Roni Shye - November 21, 2017

For people who need to take insulin, there are a couple of different typeslong-acting, short-acting, rapid-acting, intermediate-acting, etc. That’s a lot of options!

One question I see most often is the difference between rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. So, let’s get into it.   

What is rapid-acting insulin?

Rapid-acting, or meal-time insulin, is a type of insulin that’s usually taken before, during, or after a meal to lower your blood sugar levels associated with meals. See More

Humalog Junior Insulin Pen Now In Pharmacies

Roni Shye - October 19, 2017

Short-acting insulin is the dose you give yourself to compensate for the amount of food or carbohydrates you eat. Some short-acting insulins include Humalog, Novolog, and Afrezza.

Most of these insulins have been designed for use in adults. However, a new short-acting insulin has been approved for use in children—Humalog Junior KwikPen.

What is Humalog prescribed for?

Humalog is indicated for the treatment of diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. See More

Safe Needle Disposal: What You Need to Know

Roni Shye - September 28, 2017

Proper disposal of sharp medical objects—like syringes, needles, or lancets—is important to prevent injury. The improper disposal of needles or sharps is dangerous and can increase the risk for a needle stick injury, which can spread blood-borne diseases like HIV or various forms of hepatitis.

Many states have laws regarding sharp disposal, so it’s important to understand proper disposal practices. See More

Adlyxin for Diabetes Type 2 Now Available in Pharmacies

Roni Shye - May 31, 2017

Back in July, the FDA approved Adlyxin for diabetes type 2, and it is now available in pharmacies!

When people think about injectable diabetes medications, the first thing that comes to mind tends to be insulin medications like Humalog (insulin lispro) or Lantus (insulin glargine). However, the FDA has been approving many new non-insulin products recently, like Victoza and Byetta, and now Adlyxin!

What is Adlyxin indicated for?

Adlyxin is a GLP-1 agonist, a hormone that helps stimulate the production of insulin and normalize blood sugar levels. See More

This Class of Drugs Causes Almost 100,000 Annual Emergency Visits

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 07, 2016

Insulin: legal, widely used, and transforms lives. But there are risks—soon you’ll see why we try to spare our type II diabetics from having to start insulin. Using oral medications to their maximum dose and incorporating diet and lifestyle changes is the way to go before resorting to insulin.

Of course, tight blood sugar control is the goal for reducing diabetes related complications (kidney disease, eye disease, neuropathy) but insulin remains one of the most challenging aspects of diabetes management given the risks. See More

GoodRx is not sponsored by or affiliated with any of the pharmacies identified in its price comparisons. All trademarks, brands, logos and copyright images are property of their respective owners and rights holders and are used solely to represent the products of these rights holders. This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. GoodRx is not offering advice, recommending or endorsing any specific prescription drug, pharmacy or other information on the site. GoodRx provides no warranty for any of the pricing data or other information. Please seek medical advice before starting, changing or terminating any medical treatment.
In all states except Tennessee, GoodRx is considered a marketer of prescription discount cards, and is not required to register as a discount card provider. In Tennessee, GoodRx is registered as a Prescription Drug Discount Plan Operator.
Safe Pharmacy