Heart Failure Savings Tips

Savings Tips for Heart Failure

Get the latest updates on this condition from the GoodRx medical team.

  • What’s the Best Beta Blocker for Heart Failure?

    March 29, 2016

    Beta blockers save lives after heart attack and improve mortality for heart failure patients. They also work well to control blood pressure. Carvedilol (Coreg was the brand name) has been known as the “heart failure beta blocker”—but now it appears that metoprolol (Lopressor) may share that title.

    Many of my patients are asking: which is better? Let’s look at the recent evidence.

    What’s the difference between carvedilol and metoprolol?
    Carvedilol is known as a “non-selective beta blocker” meaning it blocks all beta receptors throughout the body. See More

  • Recall: Hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) Capsules

    November 10, 2015

    Generic manufacturer American Health Packaging has issued a voluntary recall of two lots of hydrochlorothiazide, a diuretic (sometimes known as a “water pill”) used to treat water retention or high blood pressure.

    This is a class II recall, the most common type of recall, which means that there is a situation where use of the recalled medication may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences, but the likelihood of serious adverse effects is small. See More

  • Jardiance for Diabetes Reduces Deaths from Heart Disease

    September 17, 2015

    Good news! In a just-published study, Jardiance (empagliflozin) for type 2 diabetes has been shown to reduce deaths from cardiovascular disease.

    The results are impressive. Comparing Jardiance to a placebo, the study showed a 38% reduction in the risk of death from a cardiovascular cause (3.7% with Jardiance vs 5.9% with placebo). Jardiance was also shown to reduce the risk of any cardiovascular event (heart attack, stroke, or death) by 14%, and to reduce the risk of death from all causes by 32%. See More

  • Meet Corlanor: A New Drug for Heart Failure

    August 06, 2015

    Advances in medicine have led to longer lives—but as we live longer, there has also been an increasing incidence of heart failure. Despite some improvements in the available treatments, the mortality rate in people with heart failure is still unacceptably high. Now, the first in a new class of drugs has just been approved for use in heart failure, and it may be able to help.

    Here are 10 things to know about Corlanor (ivabradine), the new medication for heart failure:

    1. How does it work? Corlanor works by inhibiting specific channels within the body’s natural pacemaker—the sinoatrial (SA) node.
    2.  See More
  • Recall: Generic Lisinopril for High Blood Pressure

    July 29, 2015

    Manufacturer Wockhardt has issued a voluntary recall of four lots of generic lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil), an ACE inhibitor used to help lower blood pressure and treat heart failure.

    This is a class II recall, the most common type of recall, which means that there is a situation where use of the recalled medication may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences, but the likelihood of serious adverse effects is small. See More

  • 8 Reasons to Get a Standing Desk

    April 16, 2015

    Sitting is bad, you knew that—but recent studies have confirmed that prolonged sitting is a risk factor for chronic disease. This includes heart disease, which cost the US almost $109 billion in 2010 alone according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), including medications and other health care.

    What has also been revealed is that physical activity outside of work doesn’t take away all the ill effects of sitting. See More

  • Seven Uses for Spironolactone: Skin, Hair, and Heart

    April 07, 2015

    For a really cheap and safe medication, spironolactone has many uses. From heart health to hair growth this potassium-sparing diuretic is safe and effective.

    How does spironolactone work for so many conditions? When it comes to the heart, lowering blood pressure, and helping relieve edema, spironolactone works by competing with aldosterone for receptor sites in the kidneys—which increases sodium and water removal while conserving potassium. See More

  • Is Coffee Bad for You?

    January 22, 2015

    Is drinking coffee bad for me? For a drink as popular as coffee, its physiologic effects are something you should learn about. You will be reassured I’m sure.

    The Good

    Maintaining alertness is a well-known benefit and what most of us rely on caffeine for. But what else? Every day my patients ask me if coffee is bad for their heart. In addition to caffeine coffee contains polyphenols which are dietary antioxidants. See More

  • Heart Patients More Likely to Skip Pills If They Look Different

    July 22, 2014

    Generic drugs are crucial to the treatment of heart disease. Generics save lives in our heart patients, ranging from blood pressure meds and blood thinners to anti-arrhythmic drugs. They are cheap and well tolerated. Why is it, then, that so many patients stop taking them? One half of patients with heart disease don’t take their meds even in the year after a heart attack. Turns out, the way they look matters. See More

  • Generic Diovan is Now Available!

    July 17, 2014

    The long expected arrival of generic Diovan (valsartan) is finally here!

    I know there has been a lot of anticipation for the release of this highly popular blood pressure medication and it is now finally available. Diovan combined with hydrochlorothiazide (Diovan HCT) has been available as generic valsartan/hctz for quite some time now, and there has been plenty of speculation as to when plain Diovan would make its generic debut. See More

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