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Rosuvastatin Coupon - Rosuvastatin 10mg tablet
CrestorRosuvastatin
Crestor (rosuvastatin) is used to lower cholesterol levels. Rosuvastatin is slightly less popular than other statins. It is available in brand and generic versions. Generic rosuvastatin is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but some pharmacy coupons or cash prices may be lower. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of rosuvastatin is around $10.80, 94% off the average retail price of $181.46. Compare statins.
Prescription Settings
generic
tablet
10mg
30 tablets
Rosuvastatin Coupon - Rosuvastatin 10mg tablet
rosuvastatin(generic)
tablet
10mg
30 tablets

Crestor Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Prescription Drug Coupons: How to Use Pharmacy Discounts & Manufacturer Savings Cards

Roni Shye
Roni Shye -

You’re ready to pick up your prescription at the pharmacy. But how expensive will it be? And is there anything you can do to save money? Let’s discuss how to use pharmacy discount coupons and manufacturer savings cards to help you save on the medications you need.

First, what’s the difference between pharmacy discount coupons and manufacturer savings cards?

Pharmacy discount coupons

Pharmacy discount coupons, like the ones you’ll find on GoodRx. See More

Prices for Brand Drugs Spike Before a Generic Is Released. Here’s Why.

Tori Marsh
Tori Marsh -

When a brand-name drug goes generic, its price typically drops, by as much as half of what it was before. But a new GoodRx analysis shows that in the months prior to going generic, many brand-name drugs see large increases in their cash price, with prices rising by as much as 50%.

This increase then serves as a new, higher baseline price when the generic hits the market. The new generic price can often be higher than the cost of the brand drug just a few months earlier. See More

Why Can’t I Have Grapefruit With My Statin?

Roni Shye
Roni Shye -

Has your doctor ever warned you about taking statins with grapefruits? It may seem like a strange association, but certain statins like Lipitor (atorvastatin) and Zocor (simvastatin) that are used to lower cholesterol levels can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice and cause harmful side effects. 

How do statins interact with grapefruit?

Statins are broken down in the liver by a select group of enzymes that also interact with chemicals in grapefruits. See More

Is Your Medication Causing Hair Loss? These 11 Drugs Are Common Culprits

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

While it’s normal to lose a bit of hair every day, if you are experiencing excessive hair loss or balding, the medications you are taking could be to blame.

Here are 11 drugs that have been known to cause excessive hair loss:

1) Cholesterol-lowering medications — atorvastatin and simvastatin

Atorvastatin (Lipitor) and simvastatin (Zocor) belong to a group of cholesterol-lowering medications known as “statins”. See More

10 Common Medications That Cause Joint Pain — From Cholesterol Drugs to Asthma Inhalers

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

Joint pain, back aches, and other musculoskeletal complaints are among the most prevalent health issues out there. When it comes to joint pain specifically (known as arthralgia), arthritis is the most common cause. But before you blame your achy joints on arthritis, did you know that everyday medications can cause joint pain too? Here are 10 common offenders.

1) Antibiotic — levofloxacin 

Levofloxacin (Levaquin) belongs to a group of antibiotics known as “fluoroquinolones” and is commonly prescribed for sinus infections and pneumonia. See More

The Top 10 Most Expensive Popular Generic Drugs in the US (and How To Save)

Tori Marsh
Tori Marsh -

Patients often turn to generic medications for cheaper alternatives to brand-name drugs, but over the past couple years, prices for generics have increased substantially, and some of the most expensive generic medications run above $100 for a month’s supply. Every year, people are paying more for them despite insurance coverage due to high deductibles and formulary changes.

Last month, we reported on the most expensive drugs on the market today. See More

This Is Why Drug Prices Are Totally Broken

Doug Hirsch
Doug Hirsch -

Epipens. Sovaldi. Tysabri. Acthar. Harvoni. Every month, it seems, there’s fresh outrage–from president Trump, the Congress, in the media, and among the public–over the soaring cost of prescription drugs.   

With good reason: The cash price for the average brand-name prescription drug has increased 48% since 2013. These increases put desperately needed treatments out of reach for many, and cost taxpayers (via Medicare and Medicaid) billions of dollars more every year. See More

Doctors Answer: What One Pill Should You Be Taking?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

Doctors are often asked what ONE pill or supplement they would recommend, or take themselves. The answer to this, I have learned, depends on perspective—based on which specialty the physician practices. So, after 20 years of being surrounded doctors in many fields at an academic medical center, here is the one pill you should be taking, by specialty.

Cardiologist

Aspirin, but not for everyone. Studies of aspirin for primary prevention of heart disease suggest about a 22% reduction in risk for non-fatal heart attack. See More

40+ Drugs to Be Dropped By Insurance

Elizabeth Davis
Elizabeth Davis -

Americans, get ready for sticker shock at the pharmacy.

In 2017, the nation’s largest insurance companies will likely exclude up to 154 different drugs from coverage. If you’re taking one of these prescriptions, your co-pay is about to go way, way up.

Last year, popular drugs including Viagra and Qsymia were dropped by major insurance plans for 2016. The trend continues this year. Almost 50 popular brand-name and generic drugs will likely no longer be covered by one of the nation’s largest prescription insurance providers. See More

Is High Cholesterol Actually Bad for You?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

High cholesterol may be much ado about nothing, especially in older folks. A recent meta-analysis published in BMJ Open raises a strong argument that lowering LDL cholesterol in older people doesn’t help at all.

Where does this leave us? Are we over-treating millions of folks with cholesterol lowering drugs, “statins” like Lipitor (atorvastatin), Crestor (rosuvastatin), and Zocor (simvastatin)? Let’s take a look. See More

Copyright ©2018 GoodRx, Inc.
GoodRx is not sponsored by or affiliated with any of the pharmacies identified in its price comparisons. All trademarks, brands, logos and copyright images are property of their respective owners and rights holders and are used solely to represent the products of these rights holders. This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. GoodRx is not offering advice, recommending or endorsing any specific prescription drug, pharmacy or other information on the site. GoodRx provides no warranty for any of the pricing data or other information. Please seek medical advice before starting, changing or terminating any medical treatment.
In all states except Tennessee, GoodRx is considered a marketer of prescription discount cards, and is not required to register as a discount card provider. In Tennessee, GoodRx is registered as a Prescription Drug Discount Plan Operator.
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