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Clonazepam Coupon - Clonazepam 0.5mg tablet
ClonazepamGeneric Klonopin
Clonazepam (Klonopin) is an inexpensive drug used to treat certain types of seizures. It is also used to treat panic disorder. This drug is slightly more popular than comparable drugs. It is available in brand and generic form. Generic clonazepam is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but some pharmacy coupons or cash prices may be lower. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of clonazepam is around $9.24, 75% off the average retail price of $37.75. Compare benzodiazepines.
Prescription Settings
generic
tablet
0.5mg
60 tablets
Clonazepam Coupon - Clonazepam 0.5mg tablet
clonazepam(generic)
tablet
0.5mg
60 tablets

Clonazepam Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Treating Insomnia: Which Sleeping Pill Is Right for You?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

You may have read about the dangers of Ambien (zolpidem) or why you should stay away from habit-forming sleeping pills like Valium (diazepam) and wondered, what can I take for sleep? Fortunately, there are many options for the short-term treatment of insomnia. Here’s how to choose the right one for you.

What are my options?

Medications commonly used to treat insomnia include benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Klonopin, Restoril), atypical benzodiazepines (Ambien, Sonata, Lunesta), melatonin agonists (Rozerem), antidepressants (Silenor, amitriptyline, trazodone) and our newest one, Belsomra. See More

Here’s What You Need To Know About Your Meds If You’re 65 Or Older

Katie Mui
Katie Mui -

As we get older, our bodies start turning on us. Our blood pressure begins to rise, joints develop arthritis, and arteries start clogging up. We end up taking more and more medications. Some 90% of people over the age of 65 take at least one medication per week, and 40% take five or more. 1 in 6 people in this age group will inevitably experience a harmful side effect of a drug they are taking regularly. See More

10 Medications You Shouldn’t Mix With Alcohol

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

“Can I have a drink while I’m taking my medication?” This is a question that primary care doctors are frequently asked, rightly so. Almost 50% of Americans report taking a prescription medication in the previous month. Alcohol in moderation (3 – 5 drinks per week) is recommended for stroke and heart disease prevention, and many folks taking medications known to interact with alcohol still report regular use. See More

Memory Loss Meds: Can Xanax and Valium Increase Your Risk of Alzheimers?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

Benzodiazepines are great for anxiety but used long term there are downsides. Long-term use of benzodiazepines can be habit forming and oh—put you at increased risk of Alzheimer disease.

Common benzodiazepines like Xanax (alprazolam), Ativan (lorazepam) and Valium (diazepam) are used to treat anxiety symptoms, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder and have been associated with cognitive impairment in some older adults. See More

Which Americans Take the Most Sedatives?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

Benzodiazepines (Ativan, Valium, Xanax) are more often prescribed in the South and less often in the West, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

Benzodiazepines are a class of prescription drugs prone to abuse, and in 2012 doctors wrote 37.6 benzodiazepine prescriptions per 100 persons in the United States. Remember benzodiazepines come in short-acting forms like Ativan (lorazepam) and Xanax (alprazolam) and longer-acting forms like Klonopin (clonazepam). See More

Pill Splitting: When Is It OK?

Dr. Sharon Orrange
Dr. Sharon Orrange -

If you take prescription drugs to treat a chronic illness, it’s possible to save more than 50% off cost of your medication by simply splitting your pills.

Sadly, it’s not all that easy to know when pill splitting is all right.

Not all pills can be split. However, many doctors and insurance companies are advising this strategy with an increasing number of medicines. (It’s also worth noting that the American Medical Association, the American Pharmacists Association, and most pharmaceutical companies oppose pill-splitting. See More

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