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Ciprofloxacin

CIPROFLOXACIN is a quinolone antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Compare quinolone antibiotics.
Ciloxan Coupon - Ciloxan 3.5g of 0.3% tube of ointment
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Ciloxan Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Avoid the Sun If You Take These Drugs

The GoodRx Pharmacist - August 24, 2016

If you’re enjoying the sunshine one last time as summer comes to an end, it is important to know that some of your medications could cause you an unexpected problem. You may not be aware, but some prescriptions can increase your sensitivity to sunlight—causing your skin to burn more easily.

What type of reaction can occur?

If your medication has a warning to avoid sunlight, don’t ignore it. See More

Are Antibiotics Levaquin and Cipro Dangerous?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 05, 2016

Cipro (ciprofloxacin) and Levaquin (levofloxacin) are commonly prescribed fluoroquinolone antibiotics that have been making news recently. (Moxifloxacin and ofloxacin are some other examples).

Why have they been in the news? Restrictions have recently been placed on their use. While they are effective for the treatment of pneumonia, urinary tract infections, sinusitis and bronchitis among other things, there are some major downsides. See More

FDA Safety Alert: Quinolone Antibiotics

The GoodRx Pharmacist - May 25, 2016

The FDA has issued a safety alert for a certain type of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones, also known as quinolones.

According to the FDA, there is new information that quinolone antibiotics may cause very serious side effects when used to treat sinusitis, bronchitis, and urinary tract infections.

What kind of serious side effects can occur if a quinolone antibiotic is used to treat these conditions?

Heads up—this is a serious new warning. See More

Dropped by Insurance: Changes for Ear, Nose, and Throat Meds in 2015

The GoodRx Pharmacist - September 29, 2014

As 2014 comes to a close, we should be thinking about what to expect for 2015. The start of a new year is a time for new challenges, new goals, and inevitably, a new prescription formulary.

What does this mean for you?

Express Scripts and Caremark have decided to remove certain ear, nose, and throat (ENT) drugs for allergies and ear infections from their national preferred formulary and have provided a list of covered alternatives. See More

5 Important Things to Know About Your Kids’ Antibiotics

The GoodRx Pharmacist - July 11, 2014

Having a sick child can leave you, the parent, feeling helpless. After spending your morning in the doctor’s office the last thing you need to worry about is your child’s prescription. Here are 5 key things to know when your child is prescribed an antibiotic:

1.  Not all liquid medications have to taste bad

All liquid medications already have a predetermined flavor from the manufacturer ranging anywhere from fruity strawberry to bitter mint. See More

What’s the Best Treatment for an Ear Infection?

The GoodRx Pharmacist - June 16, 2014

Ear infections are caused by either a bacteria or a virus. The infection leads to inflammation, usually in the middle part of the ear. Young children are often more prone to ear infections because their ears aren’t yet fully developed, though adults may also get ear infections.

Where do most ear infections occur?

Ear infections most often occur in the middle part of the ear.

What are signs and symptoms of an ear infection?

Ear infections in children as well as adults sometimes include symptoms such as:

  • Pulling at one or both ears (due to ear pain)
  • Crying
  • Fever
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Drainage from the ear
  • Reduced/fuzzy hearing

How are ear infections treated?

Treatment with an oral pain reliever like Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Motrin (ibuprofen) usually helps alleviate fever and pain within a few hours. See More

Ten Things You Can Do to Prevent Illness from an Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Dr. Sharon Orrange - November 20, 2013

Antibiotic resistance is a big problem. You’ve all heard about Methicillin-Resistant Staph Aureus (MRSA) causing skin and soft tissue infections but now there is a growing group of resistant bacteria. What this means is many folks may face treatment with an intravenous antibiotic or older more toxic antibiotic to treat common infections like E. Coli urinary tract infections. This is because the bacteria have gotten smart and know how to resist penicillins, ciprofloxacin and Bactrim among others. See More

Tingling and Burning: Fluoroquinolones and Peripheral Neuropathy

Dr. Sharon Orrange - August 19, 2013

Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibiotics that include levofloxacin (Levaquin), ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin,and moxifloxacin (Avelox). Antibiotics are over-prescribed for viral upper respiratory infections and before you think to yourself “I’ve been sick for awhile, maybe I should get an antibiotic,” be aware of some of the risks.

Don’t get me wrong, these are great antibiotics with broad coverage that save lives when used for the proper indications. See More

FDA Warning for Zithromax (Z-Pak)

Elizabeth Davis - April 15, 2013

The FDA recently posted a safety announcement that Zithromax (azithromycin)—the super-popular Z-Pak antibiotic—can cause potentially fatal irregular heart rhythms, or arrhythmias.

What does that mean for you?

If you have an existing heart condition, be aware and talk to your doctor about your options if you need an antibiotic. Other macrolide antibiotics (clarithromycin, erythromycin) and quinolone antibiotics (Cipro, Levaquin) have the same potential side effect, but there are other options out there and your doctor will best be able to weigh your risk against your need for a particular medication. See More

The Travelers Medicine Cabinet: What Meds Should You Bring on Your Trip?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - August 06, 2012

Whether you are travelling to Peru, Tanzania, Indonesia or Puerto Vallarta, among other exotic locations you will likely visit your doctor or travel clinic to see what you need before your trip.

In addition to the necessary vaccines (which you can find on the CDC Travelers’ Health website http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/list.htm) here are some things you should think about having with you before you leave. See More

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