Advertisement
Celexa Coupon - Celexa 10mg tablet

Citalopram

CITALOPRAM is a medicine for depression. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of citalopram is around $4.00, 88% off the average retail price of $33.51. Compare SSRIs.
Celexa Coupon - Celexa 10mg tablet

Celexa Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

10 Medications That Cause Shaky Hands – and How To Know It’s Not Parkinson’s

Dr. Sharon Orrange - August 09, 2018

My hands are shaking. Is it Parkinson’s? Something else? Shakiness, or tremors, is a common problem that brings patients to my office. If you start having shaky hands, you may worry that you have Parkinson’s disease, but many other things can cause tremors—like medications. The good news is, drug-induced tremors go away with lower doses or if you stop taking the medication.

Signs a medication may be causing your tremor

Medications can both cause tremors and make them worse. See More

Depression and Anxiety Prescriptions Are Climbing Nationwide

Tori Marsh - June 07, 2018

Prescriptions for depression and anxiety medications are on the rise among Americans – and parts of the country appear to be coping with higher rates than others, according to a GoodRx analysis of prescription data for anxiety and depression medicines.

The data looks at the proportion of depression and anxiety medications among overall prescription volume over the past 12 months (ending April 2018). See More

The Ten Worst Medications to Take While Applying for Life Insurance

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 20, 2018

After practicing medicine for 20 years, I’ve become adept at “clarifying” to life insurance companies why patients are taking certain medications. The same medications appear to trigger red flags for both long-term care and life insurance companies.   

Their “concern” makes sense for some medications because they are used for serious chronic illnesses, but for others, the insurance companies are worried about your lifestyle. See More

Could Your Medication Be Causing Insomnia?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - May 30, 2017

Impaired sleep (insomnia) is a major complaint from patients in my practice, with huge personal and economic costs. When it comes to treatments for either difficulty going to sleep or staying asleep, looking for an easily reversible cause is the first step.

One of the first places to look: many drugs may affect the quality and duration of sleep. These 18 meds have been shown in studies to do just that. See More

10 Medications You Shouldn’t Mix With Alcohol

Dr. Sharon Orrange - April 04, 2017

“Can I have a drink while I’m taking my medication?” This is a question that primary care doctors are frequently asked, rightly so. Almost 50% of Americans report taking a prescription medication in the previous month. Alcohol in moderation (3 – 5 drinks per week) is recommended for stroke and heart disease prevention, and many folks taking medications known to interact with alcohol still report regular use. See More

How Do I Say That? The Art and Science of Naming Drugs

Tori Marsh - March 30, 2017

Working with prescription drugs every day, I constantly find myself pausing over their obscure names that are oftentimes impossible to pronounce. Xeljanz? Idarucizumab? Tecfidera? How did these crazy names come to be, and who can we blame? I was interested, so I went down the rabbit hole…

Drugs have (at least) three names.

Right when a drug is developed, the naming process begins, starting with the chemical name. See More

Mixing Over the Counter and Prescription Medications? Here’s What You Need to Know

Roni Shye - February 25, 2017

Americans’ use of supplements, prescriptions and over the counter (OTC) medications has been steadily increasing over the past couple of years. This increase can sometimes put patients at risk for complications and interactions. Believe it or not, a lot of over-the-counter medications can actually interact with your prescription medications (and affect how they work) without you even realizing it. See More

How Do I Stop My Antidepressant?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - May 18, 2016

You and your healthcare provider have decided it’s time to wean off your antidepressant and now you wonder: what is the best way to stop? Does taking it slow make more sense than cold turkey? What symptoms might I feel?

First: the “discontinuation syndrome” is worse when you stop your antidepressant abruptly. This may include dizziness, nausea, fatigue, muscle aches, chills, anxiety, and irritability. See More

11 Truths About Depression and Antidepressants

Dr. Sharon Orrange - August 24, 2015

Almost 10% of Americans will battle depression over their lifetime.  Some people will find themselves depressed after a traumatic life event; for others, it’s a constant battle.
While depression can happen to anyone, here are some surprising statistics:

  • People living in the southeast US tend to have a higher incidence of depression.
  • People with lower levels of education tend to report more depression.
  •  See More
GoodRx is not sponsored by or affiliated with any of the pharmacies identified in its price comparisons. All trademarks, brands, logos and copyright images are property of their respective owners and rights holders and are used solely to represent the products of these rights holders. This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. GoodRx is not offering advice, recommending or endorsing any specific prescription drug, pharmacy or other information on the site. GoodRx provides no warranty for any of the pricing data or other information. Please seek medical advice before starting, changing or terminating any medical treatment.
In all states except Tennessee, GoodRx is considered a marketer of prescription discount cards, and is not required to register as a discount card provider. In Tennessee, GoodRx is registered as a Prescription Drug Discount Plan Operator.
Safe Pharmacy