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Celebrex Coupon - Celebrex 100mg capsule

Celecoxib

Celecoxib (Celebrex) is a moderately priced drug used to treat arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. It may also be used for pain or painful monthly periods. This drug is slightly more popular than comparable drugs. It is available in brand and generic form. Generic celecoxib is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but some pharmacy coupons or cash prices may be lower. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of celecoxib is around $16.01, 92% off the average retail price of $204.48. Compare NSAIDs.
Celebrex Coupon - Celebrex 100mg capsule

Celebrex Latest News

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Prescription Medications To Treat Endometriosis Pain – What Are the Current Options?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - September 14, 2018

Endometriosis is a common cause of painful periods, pelvic pain and infertility, affecting more than 11% of women in the US ages 15 to 44. Unfortunately, non-surgical treatments for endometriosis have been limited. In fact, the introduction of Orilissa in July marked the first time a new endometriosis drug has entered the market in nearly 10 years! Here’s what you should know about current treatment options. See More

I Think I Have Gout – Now What?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - September 05, 2018

If you think you have gout, you’re not alone—joint pain is common and the prevalence of gout has increased over the past 30 years. Gout typically shows up as painful, red, hot, and swollen joint, usually in the lower extremities. 80% of gout involves a single joint (most often the big toe or knee), and attacks often occur at night or early in the morning.

Why is gout more common now? There are three reasons this is true: we are living longer, we have higher rates of obesity and other chronic diseases like diabetes, and we have higher rates of uncontrolled high blood pressure. See More

Drug Makers Keep Promises to Limit Price Increases to 10% — But Barely

Jeroen van Meijgaard - August 01, 2018

As outrage over high drug prices has intensified over the past several years, drug companies took what seemed like a bold stand at the time: They would keep price increases below 10% annually. For the most part, they have kept their promise—but they’ve pushed the price hikes to the limit, with a burst of price hikes between 9% and 10% since the end of January 2018.

Four companies officially pledged to limit their price increases: AbbVie, Allergan, Novo Nordisk, and Valeant according to the non-profit organization Public Citizen. See More

6 Non-Opioid Options for Pain Relief — and How To Choose the Best One for Your Pain

Marie Beaugureau - July 13, 2018

Opioids like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine have long been considered some of the most helpful drugs for managing acute pain. However, rates of opioid abuse and overdose deaths have skyrocketed in recent years. And now it turns out that there’s another reason to avoid opioids: they may not be the most effective treatment for pain relief after all.

Do opioids work better than other pain relievers?

Not necessarily. See More

Medications That Can Raise Your Blood Pressure

Dr. Sharon Orrange - April 02, 2018

With new guidelines issued by the American Heart Association, the goal blood pressure for all adults is now less than 130/80. The first number of your blood pressure, 130, is the systolic blood pressure and the second number, 80, is diastolic.

It is estimated almost half of Americans may meet the criteria for high blood pressure (BP), which can increase the risk for serious adverse cardiovascular events. See More

What New Treatments Are Best for Lower Back Pain?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - August 20, 2017

Low back pain is a part of life—common across sexes, age groups, and countries, it’s something that almost all people experience at some point. Treatment for low back pain often includes a combination of medication and non-medication options. What should you start with? What treatments have the best evidence? And more importantly . . . what’s coming our way for low back pain treatment?

To start #OldSchool—the best evidence exists for these three treatments:

  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).
  •  See More

These 10 Drugs Could Harm Your Eyes

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 25, 2017

Your eyes have a combination of a relatively small size with a rich blood supply that makes them extra vulnerable to negative side effects from medications.

These side effects vary—and may involve the lens, retina or cornea. If you’re older, or using a medication at a high dose for a longer period of time, be aware that your risk will be higher.

Here are ten oral medications known to have adverse effects on the eye:

  1. Alendronate (Fosamax) is taken once a week and belongs to a class of medications used for osteoporosis called bisphosphonates.
  2.  See More

10 Medications You Shouldn’t Mix With Alcohol

Dr. Sharon Orrange - April 04, 2017

“Can I have a drink while I’m taking my medication?” This is a question that primary care doctors are frequently asked, rightly so. Almost 50% of Americans report taking a prescription medication in the previous month. Alcohol in moderation (3 – 5 drinks per week) is recommended for stroke and heart disease prevention, and many folks taking medications known to interact with alcohol still report regular use. See More

How Do I Say That? The Art and Science of Naming Drugs

Tori Marsh - March 30, 2017

Working with prescription drugs every day, I constantly find myself pausing over their obscure names that are oftentimes impossible to pronounce. Xeljanz? Idarucizumab? Tecfidera? How did these crazy names come to be, and who can we blame? I was interested, so I went down the rabbit hole…

Drugs have (at least) three names.

Right when a drug is developed, the naming process begins, starting with the chemical name. See More

Is Ibuprofen Bad for My Heart? What You Need to Know About NSAIDs

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 16, 2015

Update July 2015: The FDA is strengthening the existing black box warning on all prescription and over-the-counter NSAIDs. The current warning has been in place since 2005, but based on a recent review, the labeling will be updated with new information and stronger language. You should know that there is greater risk at higher doses, and there may be an increased risk of heart attack or stroke as early as the first weeks of use. See More

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