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Carvedilol Coupon - Carvedilol 25mg tablet

Generic Coreg

CARVEDILOL is a beta-blocker. Beta-blockers reduce the workload on the heart and help it to beat more regularly. This medicine is used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of carvedilol is around $4.00, 92% off the average retail price of $50.70. Compare nonselective Alpha/Beta blockers.
Carvedilol Coupon - Carvedilol 25mg tablet

Carvedilol Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Bystolic Generic is Still a Few Years Out — Here’s How To Save Now

Tori Marsh - July 24, 2018

High blood pressure can lead to dangerous conditions like heart attack and stroke, so it’s important to keep it under control. Unfortunately, treatments like brand-only Bystolic (nebivolol) can be expensivea monthly supply can cost well beyond $150 without insurance. What’s more, some commercial plans require patients to get a prior authorization and/or go through step therapy to be covered for Bystolic. See More

10 Common Medications That Cause Joint Pain — From Cholesterol Drugs to Asthma Inhalers

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 18, 2018

Joint pain, back aches, and other musculoskeletal complaints are among the most prevalent health issues out there. When it comes to joint pain specifically (known as arthralgia), arthritis is the most common cause. But before you blame your achy joints on arthritis, did you know that everyday medications can cause joint pain too? Here are 10 common offenders.

1) Antibiotic — levofloxacin 

Levofloxacin (Levaquin) belongs to a group of antibiotics known as “fluoroquinolones” and is commonly prescribed for sinus infections and pneumonia. See More

6 Outdated High Blood Pressure Medications You Should Consider Upgrading

Dr. Sharon Orrange - May 23, 2018

If you’ve been able to control your high blood pressure with the same hypertension medications for years, it’s tempting to hold the course — but don’t. Older medications can cause serious side effects, and updated guidelines for treating high blood pressure are released every year with recommendations for current best therapies.

It’s natural for newer medications that work better and pose fewer risks to replace older ones. See More

Do You Have Asthma? These Medications Could Be Making It Worse

Roni Shye - February 07, 2018

The number of people who have asthma continues to grow – an estimated 24.6 million Americans are currently suffering from the disease. Things that can trigger asthma include allergies, exercise, acid reflux, and irritants like smoke or perfumes. But did you know that prescription and over-the-counter medications can also cause problems with asthma?

Here are some medications that can make your asthma worse, or even cause an asthma attack. See More

Is Your Prescription Making You Tired?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - November 28, 2017

More than one in ten visits to a primary care doctor is for fatigue. Fatigue is composed of three major components: generalized weakness (difficulty in initiating activities), easy fatigability (difficulty in completing activities), and mental fatigue (difficulty with concentration and memory). While certainly not the only answer, medications may cause fatigue. Here are some of the common culprits.   

Beta Blockers

Beta-blockers wear many hats. See More

10 Most Common Drug Combinations

Tori Marsh - November 07, 2017

Did you know that nearly 7 in 10 Americans take a prescription drug, and about 50% of Americans take at least two? In many cases, taking more than one drug is necessary to cure an ailment, treat symptoms, or control a chronic disease. But in others, multiple drugs may not mix well in your body, and in your pocketbook.

We’ve compiled a list of drugs commonly taken together. We’ll tell you more about why these drugs are taken together, and which ones work. See More

Could Your Meds Be Causing Diarrhea?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - November 06, 2017

Most diarrhea will resolve within 24 to 48 hours—if it’s caused by viral gastroenteritis (a stomach bug) or food borne illness. If your diarrhea is hanging on and not resolving, take a look at your medications. It can be challenging to identify which medication may be causing drug-induced diarrhea, especially if you’re taking multiple medications. Here are some well-known offenders commonly associated with drug-induced diarrhea. See More

Choosing Your Blood Pressure Medication: What Type Is Best for You?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - January 31, 2017

High blood pressure is a key risk factor for stroke and heart disease, but it is easy to treat! If you have tried lifestyle changes and your blood pressures is still greater than 140/90, your doctor may discuss starting a medication to lower your pressure. If this is the case, it might be difficult to decide on which blood pressure medication is best for you. However, it turns out this question has been well studied, and the answer partly depends on your age and race. See More

What’s the Best Beta Blocker for Heart Failure?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - March 29, 2016

Beta blockers save lives after heart attack and improve mortality for heart failure patients. They also work well to control blood pressure. Carvedilol (Coreg was the brand name) has been known as the “heart failure beta blocker”—but now it appears that metoprolol (Lopressor) may share that title.

Many of my patients are asking: which is better? Let’s look at the recent evidence.

What’s the difference between carvedilol and metoprolol?
Carvedilol is known as a “non-selective beta blocker” meaning it blocks all beta receptors throughout the body. See More

Is Your Medication Making You Tired?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 10, 2014

One in ten visits to a primary care doctor is for fatigue. While certainly not the only cause, your medications can be the culprit for making you sleepy. Here are the players you need to know about.

Beta blockers. These are medications used for high blood pressure, migraine prevention, control of heart rate in atrial fibrillation, and they improve mortality after heart attack. Ok, now for the downside. They can make you sleepy. See More

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