Author: Dr. Sharon Orrange

two prescription bottles with pills next to them

Synthroid (levothyroxine) is the most commonly prescribed medication in the US, and is used to treat hypothyroidism—often for a lifetime. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, or under-active thyroid, may include fatigue, weight loss, anxiety and depression. Here are seven questions I get asked a lot about levothyroxine and thyroid hormone replacement therapy. What is levothyroxine? Synthetic thyroxine… Read More

clipboard with health symbols on it

One of the most commonly prescribed medications in the United States is lisinopril, a blood pressure medication that’s been around for nearly three decades. Lisinopril relaxes the blood vessels and lower blood pressure by blocking the production of a hormone called angiotensin II. But as it turns out, lisinopril has many additional upsides for you…. Read More

a doctor's prescription pad

My hands are shaking. Is it Parkinson’s? Something else? Shakiness, or tremors, is a common problem that brings patients to my office. If you start having shaky hands, you may worry that you have Parkinson’s disease, but many other things can cause tremors—like medications. The good news is, drug-induced tremors go away with lower doses… Read More

You’ve likely heard there is a new shingles vaccine, Shingrix, that is more effective than our existing vaccine Zostavax. However, as recently as June 2018, Shingrix was in short supply, and by estimates from manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline, order limits and shipping delays will continue through 2018.  Shipments of Shingrix are making their way to clinics, but you… Read More

a doctor's prescription pad

Doctors are increasingly faced with questions from patients about marijuana and its medical uses. A common question we hear is, “What’s the difference between the pill forms like Marinol (dronabinol) and medical marijuana?” Let’s start with the fact that dronabinol (Marinol, Syndros), nabilone (Cesamet) and cannabidiol (Epidiolex) are medications approved by the FDA. Currently, there… Read More

two prescription bottles with pills next to them

Pain medications like opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a major cause of constipation, often creating a bigger struggle than the original illness that led you to start taking them. So, why does medication-induced constipation happen and how do you treat it? Why does constipation happen? Opioids like Vicodin, Norco and Tylenol with codeine and… Read More

two prescription bottles with pills next to them

It’s logical to wonder if a medication you often take for pain is safe. There are some concerns about the popular over-the-counter pain relievers known as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), which include ibuprofen (a.k.a. Motrin or Advil). Every week, I’m asked: How much can I take, and is it bad for my liver or kidneys?… Read More

a doctor's prescription pad

If you’ve noticed you are sweating more than usual—not just on your palms and soles, but all over—take a look at your medication list. The new occurrence of excess sweating everywhere on your body can be a result of many causes including diabetes, thyroid disease and infection, so it requires a careful evaluation by your… Read More

assortment of medicines

Whether from a new injury or an aggravated old injury, stiffness and soreness in the neck and back at night may lead to disrupted sleep and more pain in the morning. Muscle relaxants have been shown to help relieve this pain and get you through these tough days—used at night, these medications may improve acute… Read More

blue pills in dose pack

Metformin is the first-line oral treatment for type 2 diabetes. It enhances the effects of insulin on the liver and skeletal muscles. That, we know. What we didn’t know until recently is how many benefits we would discover for metformin that aren’t related to diabetes, leading many to wonder if metformin is the Holy Grail…. Read More