Month: November 2017

For women having trouble getting pregnant, the decision to try in-vitro fertilization (IVF) is a big deal. It requires 4 to 6 weeks of almost daily office visits, monitoring, and medication – and after everything’s said and done, the average cost of one IVF cycle is $23,000. Those who can afford it or whose insurance… Read More

blue pills in dose pack

The next few months will mark the launch of generic alternatives for Viagra (sildenafil) and Cialis (tadalafil), the two most popular erectile dysfunction (ED) medications. Viagra, approved to treat Erectile dysfunction in men, could see a generic as soon as December 11th, 2017. Generic Cialis will arrive in pharmacies soon after, with an anticipated generic… Read More

two prescription bottles with pills next to them

More than one in ten visits to a primary care doctor is for fatigue. Fatigue is composed of three major components: generalized weakness (difficulty in initiating activities), easy fatigability (difficulty in completing activities), and mental fatigue (difficulty with concentration and memory). While certainly not the only answer, medications may cause fatigue. Here are some of… Read More

two prescription bottles with pills next to them

New medications used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes are popping up left and right. From 2013-2016 there have been 15 new oral and injectable medications approved for the treatment of diabetes alone. One new class of medications that you might have seen are GLP-1 agonists. This class includes injection drugs like Byetta,… Read More

a doctor's prescription pad

Mealtime insulins, or fast-acting insulins, are injected before or after each meal to regulate the blood sugar. Type 1 diabetics require mealtime insulin injections as their pancreas does not produce insulin, whereas type 2 diabetics may only require mealtime insulin if they struggle with blood sugar control after meals or are not achieving their target… Read More

assortment of medicines

Why do some medications come in tablets and others in capsules? Why are there ointments and creams? And why are some drugs delivered by injection or through an intravenous (IV) drip?    Like a lot of things in medicine, the answer can get complicated, but it boils down to this: where a drug needs to… Read More

a doctor's prescription pad

For people who need to take insulin, there are a couple of different types—long-acting, short-acting, rapid-acting, intermediate-acting, etc. That’s a lot of options! One question I see most often is the difference between rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. So, let’s get into it.    What is rapid-acting insulin? Rapid-acting, or meal-time insulin, is a type of… Read More

two prescription bottles with pills next to them

Eliquis is a common anticoagulant medication that helps prevent blood clots, stroke, and pulmonary embolism. Common, but not cheap: cash prices average around $488 for a 30-day supply. Currently, there is no Eliquis generic alternative available, but one could be available as early as 2018. Since Eliquis tends to be a maintenance drug, taken for… Read More

blood pressure meter and heart

Currently, spironolactone is only available in tablet form, which is not an option for those who have difficulty swallowing pills. In order to make this drug more accessible to all, the FDA approved CaroSpir, the 1st liquid version of spironolactone.     What is CaroSpir indicated for? CaroSpir is for the treatment of heart failure, high blood… Read More

two prescription bottles with pills next to them

One of the biggest downsides to taking a medication is side effects. After a dose of most drugs, the amount in the bloodstream spikes quickly, and then is flushed away within the course of a few hours. This means the amount of medicine in the body can vary at any point in time – and… Read More