Birth Control Savings Tips

Savings Tips for Birth Control

Get the latest updates on this condition from the GoodRx medical team.

  • These 7 Medications Can Cause Puffy Legs and Ankles

    July 18, 2017

    Medications are a common offender when it comes to lower extremity edema, either as the cause or as a factor that can make it worse. Swelling in the lower legs from fluid in the tissues—lower extremity edema—is a familiar complaint among patients. Imprints from your socks, puffy legs and feet so you can’t put your shoes on, or swelling so that you can make an indent with your thumb (pitting edema) may lead you to wonder what’s going on. See More

  • Could OTC Birth Control Be Coming to Pharmacies Soon?

    June 07, 2017

    Regular birth control pills are already available over-the-counter in many countries including China, Greece, India, Turkey, Mexico, South Africa, Russia, and Korea. In the U.S., we are slowly but surely starting to provide women with greater access to birth control products without requiring a prescription.

    In 2013, Plan B One-Step, the emergency contraceptive that can prevent pregnancy, was made available without a prescription (“over-the-counter” or OTC) without an ID or age restriction. See More

  • Recall: Mibelas 24 Fe Birth Control Pills

    June 02, 2017

    Manufacturer Lupin Pharmaceuticals has issued a voluntary recall for Mibelas 24 Fe due to a packaging error. Mibelas 24 Fe is one of several generic alternatives for Minastrin 24 Fe, a chewable birth control pill that comes with iron supplements.

    This is a class I recall, the most serious type of recall, which means that there is a situation where there is a reasonable probability that use of the recalled medication may cause serious adverse health consequences or death. See More

  • IUD vs Implant: What’s the Best Option for Long-Acting Birth Control?

    May 02, 2017

    When it comes to birth control, long-acting intrauterine devices (IUDs) and hormonal implants are not only convenient for many women—they are also 20 times more effective than pills, patches, and rings. With insurance coverage of contraception likely to be phased back out in the next couple of years, many women are asking about long-acting, reversible birth control methods.

    Studies show that 45% of pregnancies in the United States are unintended. See More

  • It’s Back! Find Generic Ortho-Tri Cyclen Lo In Pharmacies Now

    May 09, 2016

    Over 8 years ago (when I was an intern) a generic for Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo was released. Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo was already one of the most popular birth control options in the early 2000s, and it’s still used by many, many women today—so a generic was big news.

    As the only generic option at the time, Tri-Lo Sprintec quickly became a favorite, especially since co-pays and cash prices were drastically lower than brand-name Ortho Tri-Cyclen LoSee More

  • Don’t Believe These 10 Birth Control Myths

    April 12, 2016

    In clinic conversations with young women, I am always surprised by the amount of misinformation out there on oral contraceptives—aka birth control pills.

    So let’s clear some things up. Here are the 10 most common myths I hear about birth control pills, and the facts that contradict them.

    • Myth 1: “They will make me gain weight.” Many women believe that oral birth control causes weight gain. Please know that with the lower dose pills we currently prescribe, weight gain is not a consistent finding.
    •  See More
  • Update: Oregon Pharmacists Can Now Prescribe Birth Control

    January 08, 2016

    In 2015, the governor of Oregon signed a bill (HB 2879) that would allow anyone 18 years of age and older to receive birth control from a pharmacist without a doctor’s prescription.

    Now, as of January 1, 2016, Oregon pharmacists can officially prescribe and dispense birth control.

    Oregon is the first state to pass such a bill—one that may pave the way for easier access to contraceptives.

    The only other state that has passed a law to allow pharmacists to prescribe birth control is California (SB 493), though it won’t go into effect until March 2016. See More

  • Birth Control Will Be Available Without a Prescription in Oregon and California

    July 17, 2015

    This week the governor of Oregon signed a bill that will allow women 18 and older to receive birth control at their local pharmacy without needing prescription from a doctor.

    Effective January 1, 2016, Oregon pharmacists will be able to prescribe and dispense oral (pills) and topical (patches) birth control to patients 18 years of age and older.

    Oregon, along with California, is among the first states to pass such a bill, and they may pave the way for easier access to pregnancy preventing contraceptives across the country. See More

  • Paying Cash For Your Birth Control? Here’s How to Save

    July 08, 2014

    Thirty percent of women who use contraception in the United States use oral contraceptives. Add to this women who use birth control pills for other medical conditions (polycystic ovary syndrome, heavy menstrual periods, ovarian cysts, etc) and imagine the number of women who may now be forced to pay cash for these medications.

    On June 30th the Supreme Court decided that for-profit companies cannot be compelled to provide insurance coverage for contraception if doing so violates the religious beliefs of the company’s owners. See More

  • Xulane: Newly Approved Generic Ortho Evra Patch

    April 24, 2014

    As of April 16, 2014, the FDA has approved Xulane by Mylan Pharmaceuticals as a generic alternative for the Ortho Evra contraceptive patch.

    What is Ortho Evra (Xulane)?
    Xulane is a form of birth control indicated for the prevention of pregnancy. It is a topical patch that provides pregnancy prevention through skin absorption.

    How is this medication usually used?
    Xulane is a topical patch that is to be applied and changed once-weekly for 3 weeks then allowing a patch-free week on week 4. See More

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