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Basaglar (insulin glargine) is an expensive, long-acting type of insulin. It is the first biosimilar insulin used to control blood sugar levels in diabetes mellitus, including diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. It is more popular than comparable drugs. There are currently no generic alternatives for any insulin brand, but Basaglar is a biosimilar to Lantus, one of the most popular long-acting insulins. It is not covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but manufacturer and pharmacy coupons can help offset the cost.

Basaglar Latest News

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Why is Humalog Expensive? And How Can You Save?

Tori Marsh - January 17, 2018

Humalog (insulin lispro) is a fast-acting insulin used to treat diabetes type one and two. Doctors report low levels of adherence to insulins like Humalog because of its cost. Cash prices for Humalog average around $549 for five kwikpens, and there is no generic alternative for any insulin brand. Humalog generated billions of dollars in global sales for Eli Lilly in 2016.   

Here is some information on Humalog, and how you can save. See More

Why is Lantus so Expensive? And How Can You Save?

Tori Marsh - December 22, 2017

One of the only ways to treat diabetes type 1 and 2 are through insulin injections, like Lantus (insulin glargine), that help to control blood sugar. Unfortunately, doctors consistently report low levels of adherence to insulins, Lantus included. The main reason? The cost.   

Lantus is a prime example of an expensive insulinaveraging around $274 per month, it is unaffordable for many. But GoodRx is here to help.

Here is some information on Lantus, and how you can save

Why are insulins, and Lantus, so expensive?

The case of insulin prices is an interesting one. See More

Rapid-Acting Versus Long-Acting Insulin: What’s the Difference?

The GoodRx Pharmacist - November 21, 2017

For people who need to take insulin, there are a couple of different typeslong-acting, short-acting, rapid-acting, intermediate-acting, etc. That’s a lot of options!

One question I see most often is the difference between rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. So, let’s get into it.   

What is rapid-acting insulin?

Rapid-acting, or meal-time insulin, is a type of insulin that’s usually taken before, during, or after a meal to lower your blood sugar levels associated with meals. See More

FDA Approves Long-Acting Insulin Lusduna

The GoodRx Pharmacist - July 28, 2017

If you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor or health care provider has most likely prescribed you a long acting insulin like Lantus (insulin glargine), Toujeo (insulin glargine), or Basaglar (insulin glargine). These type of insulins work to control your blood sugar between meals and when you’re sleeping. They can be injected once or twice a day to give you around-the-clock blood sugar control.

Lusduna Nexvue (insulin glargine) is the newest brand of long-acting insulin to gain FDA approval. See More

This Class of Drugs Causes Almost 100,000 Annual Emergency Visits

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 07, 2016

Insulin: legal, widely used, and transforms lives. But there are risks—soon you’ll see why we try to spare our type II diabetics from having to start insulin. Using oral medications to their maximum dose and incorporating diet and lifestyle changes is the way to go before resorting to insulin.

Of course, tight blood sugar control is the goal for reducing diabetes related complications (kidney disease, eye disease, neuropathy) but insulin remains one of the most challenging aspects of diabetes management given the risks. See More

New Insulin Basaglar in Pharmacies This Year

The GoodRx Pharmacist - February 17, 2016

Basaglar (insulin glargine) is the newest brand of long-acting insulin to hit the market. It shares its active ingredient (insulin glargine) with Lantus, but is not a generic equivalent and the two can’t be substituted for each other.

Long-acting insulin like Basaglar (also sometimes referred to as basal insulin) are used to keep blood glucose levels stable throughout the day.

There are now four long-acting insulins approved by the FDA: Lantus, Levemir (insulin detemir), Toujeo (insulin glargine recombinant), Tresiba (insulin degludec), and BasaglarSee More

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