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Avapro Coupon - Avapro 150mg tablet

Irbesartan

Irbesartan (Avapro) is a moderately priced drug used to treat high blood pressure. This drug also slows down the progression of kidney disease in diabetic patients. This drug is slightly more popular than comparable drugs. It is available in brand and generic versions. Generic irbesartan is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but pharmacy coupons or cash prices may be lower. Compare ARBs.
Avapro Coupon - Avapro 150mg tablet
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Avapro Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Valsartan Too Expensive? See If You Can Switch to a Cheaper Option

Dr. Sharon Orrange - November 11, 2014

If you’ve been on Diovan or the generic version valsartan, and are being told by your insurance it will no longer be covered—you need a plan. Can you switch to losartan (Cozaar) or another medication to save money?

Though valsartan is the generic version of Diovan it’s still expensive. Both valsartan and losartan are ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers); out of the ARBs, losartan has been around the longest.

Here are some simple things to know if you’ve been told to switch your ARB to losartan:

  • The benefits of losartan include controlling blood pressure, slowing the progression of diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy), and decreasing stroke risk in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.
  •  See More

ACE Inhibitors vs ARBs: What’s the Difference?

The GoodRx Pharmacist - July 31, 2014

ACE Inhibitors and ARBS – these abbreviations may not look all that similar or even have any meaning to you as a patient. However, 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure and are likely on one of these two types of medication even if they do not know it. Drugs in these classes have the same main indication, hypertension (high blood pressure), but differ in how they work and their side effects. See More

Blood Pressure Medications and Cancer Risk

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 23, 2013

Concerns raised about ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers) have folks worried. Patients have come to our offices asking if they should switch their blood pressure medication. Let’s shed some light on the issue as there is reason for calm. Well known ARBs include losartan (Cozaar), candesartan (Atacand), irbesartan (Avapro), Benicar (olmesartan), Diovan (valsartan) and Micardis (telmisartan). They work well to lower blood pressure and the kidneys of diabetics love them. See More

Know Your Pharmacist

The GoodRx Pharmacist - April 03, 2013

It’s 8 PM on a Friday night and you just spiked a fever after receiving a flu vaccination earlier that afternoon. You feel a little weak, but don’t have any other symptoms. Do you go to the emergency room? Call your doctor after hours? Or maybe you can call the local pharmacy that’s still open and ask the pharmacist?

One of the most useful tools in your personal health care armory is available right within your community, through a pharmacist! By just calling the pharmacy, you could find out that mild symptoms following flu vaccination (symptoms that can occur in 1-5% of patients, starting 6 to 12 hours after administration and persisting for 1 to 2 days) will not require further medical treatment. See More

How Switching Meds Could Save You More Than $2000 Per Year

Elizabeth Davis - March 28, 2013

When it comes to saving on your prescriptions, sometimes the way to get the best price isn’t as straightforward as simply using a coupon or switching to a generic.

Recently, I visited a doctor to try and figure out why I was having headaches. It took months, but eventually I was diagnosed with migraines; then, I had to work with my doctor to find the right medication to manage the migraines.

Like many Americans, I have health insurance, but even with insurance, the cost of my drugs was giving me a headache. See More

Single Pill Combinations for Blood Pressure

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 12, 2013

Poor control of blood pressure (BP) is bad news, and is associated with enhanced risk of cardiovascular disease. Therapy with a single blood pressure medication fails to reach goals 75% of the time. This is just one reason that single pill combinations (two different blood pressure medications in one pill) make perfect sense.

Combining medications that have different and often complementary actions can lead to more complete and prompt reductions in BP. See More

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