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Anaprox DS Coupon - Anaprox DS 550mg tablet

Naproxen

NAPROXEN is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is used to reduce swelling and to treat pain. This medicine may be used for dental pain, headache, or painful monthly periods. It is also used for painful joint and muscular problems such as arthritis, tendinitis, bursitis, and gout. Compare NSAIDs.
Anaprox DS Coupon - Anaprox DS 550mg tablet

Anaprox DS Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

What New Treatments Are Best for Lower Back Pain?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - August 20, 2017

Low back pain is a part of life—common across sexes, age groups, and countries, it’s something that almost all people experience at some point. Treatment for low back pain often includes a combination of medication and non-medication options. What should you start with? What treatments have the best evidence? And more importantly . . . what’s coming our way for low back pain treatment?

To start #OldSchool—the best evidence exists for these three treatments:

  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).
  •  See More

10 Ways to Treat a Sore Throat

Dr. Sharon Orrange - August 06, 2017

Most sore throats in adults are caused by a viral illness and will resolve on their own without antibiotics. Signs your sore throat is likely a viral pharyngitis (sore throat) are cough, stuffy or runny nose, and diarrhea. This means many of you will be managing your throat pain at home—so what should you take for pain relief?

Here are 10 things to know:

  1. NSAIDS (ibuprofen, Motrin, Advil, naproxen, Aleve), Tylenol (acetaminophen) and aspirin will all help to relieve throat pain within 1 – 2 hours, and will provide relief for several hours.
  2.  See More

These 11 Prescriptions May Cause Ringing in the Ears

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 26, 2017

Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is a perception of sound in one or both ears in the absence of an external source. It’s often described by patients as buzzing, ringing, or whooshing.

Tinnitus can be a continuous sound or occur intermittently and while there is often no known cause, there are a handful of medications that can contribute. “Ototoxic medications” are those that may damage the inner ear. See More

These 7 Medications Can Cause Puffy Legs and Ankles

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 18, 2017

Medications are a common offender when it comes to lower extremity edema, either as the cause or as a factor that can make it worse. Swelling in the lower legs from fluid in the tissues—lower extremity edema—is a familiar complaint among patients. Imprints from your socks, puffy legs and feet so you can’t put your shoes on, or swelling so that you can make an indent with your thumb (pitting edema) may lead you to wonder what’s going on. See More

Lyrica vs Gabapentin: Which is Better for Sciatica Pain?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - April 12, 2017

Sciatica is the term for pain radiating from the low back down the back/side of your leg, sometimes with tingling. The most common cause of sciatica is a bulging or herniated disc. It affects up to 40% of adults at some point in their lives—and there is conflicting information out there on the best option for relief.

Similar to any chronic low back pain, the first place to start is with NSAIDs like naproxen (Aleve) or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) along with physical therapy. See More

These 10 Medications Can Hurt Your Esophagus (and Cause Heartburn)

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 22, 2017

Esophagitis is the term for irritation and injury to the mucosal lining of the esophagus. Medications are a common culprit and medication-induced esophagitis will give you pain behind the sternum (retrosternal pain) or heartburn 60% of the time. Other symptoms include pain with swallowing or the sensation of food getting stuck in your throat. Medications that irritate the esophagus usually cause the problem at the spot of esophageal narrowing. See More

Users Guide to Gout

Dr. Sharon Orrange - May 10, 2016

Not all big toe pain is gout—but you may have been hearing more about it recently. The prevalence of gout has increased greatly over the past 30 years.

So what is gout, why do we get it, and how can you get rid of it?

Why more gout? There is more gout for three main reasons: we live longer, more people have high blood pressure and diabetes, and common medications like aspirin and diuretics increase the risk of gout. See More

The 6 Best Ways to Treat Acute Back Pain

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 16, 2016

Only a third of people who have acute back pain see their doctor. In some ways this is good news—it implies that most improve on their own. If you have new onset back pain, (that you’ve been experiencing for less than 4 weeks), here some OTC and prescription medication options that can help you.

  1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). You will see more improvement of your symptoms after 1 week of taking NSAIDS than taking nothing.
  2.  See More

Is Ibuprofen Bad for My Heart? What You Need to Know About NSAIDs

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 16, 2015

Update July 2015: The FDA is strengthening the existing black box warning on all prescription and over-the-counter NSAIDs. The current warning has been in place since 2005, but based on a recent review, the labeling will be updated with new information and stronger language. You should know that there is greater risk at higher doses, and there may be an increased risk of heart attack or stroke as early as the first weeks of use. See More

5 Common Medications That Can Kill

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 13, 2015

You probably already know that many prescriptions have side effects. Most are mild—annoying issues like nausea or sleepiness that are inconvenient at worst. Others, however, can be deadly.

A very small number of medications are responsible for the majority of adverse side effects and hospitalizations from harmful drug reactions. How bad are these drugs? Between 2007 to 2009, almost 100,000 patients older than 65 had emergency hospitalizations for dangerous drug reactions, and almost 20,000 people die from prescription drug overdoses annually. See More

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