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Amitriptyline Coupon - Amitriptyline 25mg tablet

Generic Amitid, Amitril, Elavil, Endep

AMITRIPTYLINE is used to treat depression. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of amitriptyline is around $4.90, 70% off the average retail price of $16.51. Compare tricyclic antidepressants.
Amitriptyline Coupon - Amitriptyline 25mg tablet

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6 Non-Opioid Options for Pain Relief — and How to Choose the Best One for Your Pain

Marie Beaugureau - July 13, 2018

Opioids like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine have long been considered some of the most helpful drugs for managing acute pain. However, rates of opioid abuse and overdose deaths have skyrocketed in recent years. And now it turns out that there’s another reason to avoid opioids: they may not be the most effective treatment for pain relief after all.

Do opioids work better than other pain relievers?

Not necessarily. See More

8 Types of Medications that Can Cause Weight Gain as a Side Effect

Benita Lee - June 18, 2018

An unexpected increase in weight can be concerning for anyone. But it’s an unfortunate side effect of many common medications. Insulin, blood pressure medications, antidepressants, and even migraine medications can all cause weight gain, and some may even worsen the health conditions they’re trying to treat.

Sudden weight gain is never a reason to stop your medication without seeing your doctor first. See More

Lyrica vs. Gabapentin: Which is Better for Sciatica Pain?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - June 13, 2018

Sciatica — the pain that travels from your low back down your leg — is extremely common. It affects up to 40% of adults, but there’s a lot of conflicting information out there on which medications work best to relieve pain. Lyrica (pregabalin), Neurontin (gabapentin), and Neurontin + Elavil (amitriptyline) are all popular pain relievers, but here’s what research says about which ones actually work.

Sciatica is the term for pain radiating from the low back down the back/side of your leg, sometimes with tingling. See More

What is Lyrica Used For?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - May 29, 2018

Lyrica (pregabalin) is now one of the 10 most prescribed drugs in the United States. Chemically similar to Neurontin (gabapentin), which is also an anti-epileptic medication, Lyrica is used to treat brain- and nerve-related disorders.

To remember Lyrica’s uses outside of epilepsy, just remember: nerve pain and fibromyalgia. Lyrica received FDA approval for use in cases of partial onset seizures in adults with epilepsy (as an add-on medication), nerve pain related to diabetes and nerve pain from shingles (postherpetic neuralgia) in 2004. See More

New Study Finds that Some Drugs May Raise Dementia Risk — as Many as 20 Years Later

Tori Marsh - May 16, 2018

Turns out, taking a certain kind of drug today is associated with an increased chance of dementia as many as 20 years from now, according to a new study.

The study looked at people who had taken anticholinergic drugs that are frequently prescribed for depression, urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, asthma, Parkinson’s disease, and allergies. People who had taken drugs from specific classes of anticholinergics had as much as a 30% greater likelihood of being diagnosed with dementia later in life. See More

Is Your Prescription Making You Tired?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - November 28, 2017

More than one in ten visits to a primary care doctor is for fatigue. Fatigue is composed of three major components: generalized weakness (difficulty in initiating activities), easy fatigability (difficulty in completing activities), and mental fatigue (difficulty with concentration and memory). While certainly not the only answer, medications may cause fatigue. Here are some of the common culprits.   

Beta Blockers

Beta-blockers wear many hats. See More

These Prescriptions May Cause Ringing in the Ears

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 03, 2017

Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is a perception of sound in one or both ears in the absence of an external source. It’s often described by patients as buzzing, ringing, or whooshing. While there is often no known cause for tinnitus, there are a handful of medications that may contribute.

Medications that are known to cause tinnitus or hearing loss are considered “ototoxic medications. See More

These 11 Multitasking Meds Have Many Benefits

Dr. Sharon Orrange - April 25, 2017

Almost half of Americans have used a prescription medication in the past 30 days, for a wide variety of benefits. The benefits of medications are the helpful effects you get when you use them, such as lowering blood pressure, treating infection, or relieving pain. Turns out there are some standout medications that can accomplish two or more things, sometimes with very different effects. More than one benefit? That’s a nice upside . See More

These Drugs Could Increase Your Risk of Dementia

Dr. Sharon Orrange - January 17, 2017

When asked about the medical conditions they fear the most, adults overwhelmingly answer dementia, specifically Alzheimers dementia. Treatment options for dementia are dismal, so the focus needs to be on prevention. Many risk factors for dementia are things you can control: diabetes, high blood pressure, physical inactivity and even some medications.

Multiple studies have found an association between the use of certain medication classes with dementia and cognitive (thinking, understanding, learning, remembering) impairment in older adults. See More

These 15 Medications Can Cause a False Positive on Drug Tests

Dr. Sharon Orrange - November 15, 2016

We hear “false positive” as a defense from professional athletes all the time when it comes to drug screens—but unexpected results on drug tests really do happen.

A urine drug screen tests for the presence of certain illegal drugs and prescription medications. You may be more likely to be tested when applying for a job than when playing professional sports, but you could also be affected by a false positive. See More

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