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Abilify Coupon - Abilify 10mg tablet

Aripiprazole

Aripiprazole (Abilify) is an expensive drug used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depression. It is also used to treat Tourette's disorder and some symptoms of autism. This medicine may also be used in combination with antidepressants to treat major depressive disorder. This drug is slightly more popular than comparable drugs. It is available in brand and generic versions. Generic aripiprazole is covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but some pharmacy coupons or cash prices may be lower. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of aripiprazole is around $22.57, 96% off the average retail price of $744.01. Compare atypical antipsychotics.
Abilify Coupon - Abilify 10mg tablet

Abilify Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Prices for Brand Drugs Spike Before a Generic Is Released. Here’s Why.

Tori Marsh - July 27, 2018

When a brand-name drug goes generic, its price typically drops, by as much as half of what it was before. But a new GoodRx analysis shows that in the months prior to going generic, many brand-name drugs see large increases in their cash price, with prices rising by as much as 50%.

This increase then serves as a new, higher baseline price when the generic hits the market. The new generic price can often be higher than the cost of the brand drug just a few months earlier. See More

10 of the Craziest Medication Side Effects

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 20, 2018

Most people benefit from the therapeutic effects of a medication, but adverse events ranging from minor side effects to death may occur. Serious side effects are often unavoidable, coming without warning, and something neither the folks who suffer them or their physician will ever forget. Here are ten of the craziest medication side effects.

1) Severe blisters and peeling skin

Picture someone who ends up in a burn unit after their skin sheds off due to a medication. See More

What is Step Therapy? — How To Get Insurance To Pay for Your “Non-Preferred” Drug

Tori Marsh - June 13, 2018

To control drug costs and reduce the use of expensive medications, insurers have long relied on step therapy, a restriction on insurance coverage that requires patients to prove that less-expensive drugs are ineffective before getting coverage for a more expensive, higher-tier drug. Step therapy is another form of a prior authorization, but many argue that step therapy undermines the patient’s health and prevents them from accessing appropriate treatment. See More

This Is Why Drug Prices Are Totally Broken

Doug Hirsch - January 12, 2018

Epipens. Sovaldi. Tysabri. Acthar. Harvoni. Every month, it seems, there’s fresh outrage–from president Trump, the Congress, in the media, and among the public–over the soaring cost of prescription drugs.   

With good reason: The cash price for the average brand-name prescription drug has increased 48% since 2013. These increases put desperately needed treatments out of reach for many, and cost taxpayers (via Medicare and Medicaid) billions of dollars more every year. See More

What Can You Do If Your Antidepressant Isn’t Helping?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - October 24, 2017

If you have depression that hasn’t responded to a single antidepressant, switching to another one or adding a second medication is your next step. New evidence is guiding what to do next if you aren’t much better after 6 – 12 weeks of treatment.

When your antidepressant isn’t working to improve or relieve your depressive symptoms, what’s your next step?

40+ Drugs to Be Dropped By Insurance

Elizabeth Davis - August 17, 2016

Americans, get ready for sticker shock at the pharmacy.

In 2017, the nation’s largest insurance companies will likely exclude up to 154 different drugs from coverage. If you’re taking one of these prescriptions, your co-pay is about to go way, way up.

Last year, popular drugs including Viagra and Qsymia were dropped by major insurance plans for 2016. The trend continues this year. Almost 50 popular brand-name and generic drugs will likely no longer be covered by one of the nation’s largest prescription insurance providers. See More

2015 In Review: The Good(Rx) and Bad

Elizabeth Davis - December 29, 2015

2015 was another tough year for American’s health care budgets. Insurance premiums increased, coverage was dropped for a number of important drugs, and overall we’re spending more for our health care.

Don’t break out the antidepressants yet—it’s not all bad news. A number of important drugs went generic, which will generally mean huge savings and lower costs. Plus, a large number of drugs actually decreased in price. See More

50+ Drugs Dropped by Insurance in 2016, Including Viagra and Qsymia

Elizabeth Davis - August 12, 2015

It’s that time again—the new lists of covered and excluded drugs on next year’s insurance plans are out, and it doesn’t look great. For many Americans with health insurance, more than 50 popular brand-name and generic drugs may no longer be covered starting in January 2016.

Express Scripts and Caremark, companies that handles pharmacy benefits for more than 200 million Americans, are removing about 20 – 30 drugs each from their national preferred formularies at the end of 2015. See More

Generic Abilify Now in Pharmacies!

Roni Shye - May 06, 2015

You may have seen the many commercials for Abilify (aripiprazole) or perhaps you or someone you know take it. Especially if that’s the case, you should know that the FDA has approved the first generic versions of Abilify to treat mental illness, which means it will now be available to you at a reduced cost, and looked at more favorably by insurance companies.

On April 28, 2015, the FDA gave pharmaceutical companies Alembic, Hetero Labs, Teva, and Torrent the go-ahead to manufacture the generic version of Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Abilify oral tablets. See More

10 Things You May Not Know About the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Women

Dr. Sharon Orrange - March 03, 2015

Bipolar disorder is just as common in men as in women, yet women are more likely to experience mixed episodes. Bipolar disorder can have many types of mixed episodes but the most common are manic episodes with mixed features, and depressive episodes with mixed features.

What does that mean? Women more often experience mixed episodes. These can be manic episodes with at least three depressive symptoms (depressed mood, fatigue, suicidal ideation, etc) or depressive episodes with at least three manic symptoms. See More

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