Insulin Detemir Coupon - Insulin Detemir 5 flextouch pens of 3ml carton
Insulin Detemir


Levemir (insulin detemir) is an expensive drug used to treat diabetes mellitus, including diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. This drug is slightly less popular than comparable drugs. There are currently no generic options for any insulin brand, but less expensive biosimilar versions may be available in the future. It is not covered by most Medicare and insurance plans, but manufacturer and pharmacy coupons can help offset the cost. Compare insulins.
Insulin Detemir Coupon - Insulin Detemir 5 flextouch pens of 3ml carton

Insulin Detemir Latest News

Get the latest updates on this drug from the GoodRx medical team

Is Newly Approved Tresiba the Best Long-Acting Insulin?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - March 03, 2016

Comparing long-acting insulins? Newly approved Tresiba may come out ahead. With the exception of NPH insulin (the original long-acting insulin—examples include Humulin N and Novolin N), they are all going to cost you. So, if you are already paying big bucks for your long-acting insulin, here are some things to think about:

What does a long-acting or basal insulin do for me? This is your baseline insulin, the insulin that is secreted to control your sugars when you are not eating (in the fasting state). See More

New Diabetes Supply Prices Now on GoodRx

Elizabeth Davis - November 23, 2015

You can now find and compare diabetes supplies on GoodRx! Do a search now to see prices for glucose test strips and meters, control solution, syringes and lancets, and more.

As you may already know, shopping around online will typically get you a lower price than what you’ll find walking in to your local pharmacy.

To make it even easier to get the most savings, you can now order discounted supplies directly from Total Diabetes Supply—in addition to the low Amazon. See More

FDA Approval: First New Long-Acting Insulins in 10 Years

The GoodRx Pharmacist - October 23, 2015

There have been several new insulin products approved over the past year, including Toujeo, Humalog U-200, Afrezza—and now Tresiba and Ryzodeg.

The other recent insulin approvals are what I like to call spin-off insulin products. For example, Toujeo has the same type of insulin as Lantus (insulin glargine), but is more concentrated. Humalog U-200 is the same exact product as Humalog U-100 (insulin lispro), but once again, more concentrated. See More

5 Ways to Save More on Your Diabetes Meds

Dr. Sharon Orrange - October 06, 2015

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes. That’s more than 10% of the US—and that number continues to rise. More than 1.7 million adults were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012 alone.
Fortunately, several new medications for diabetes have recently been approved—Toujeo (a new insulin product), Synjardy (a new combination of empagliflozin/metformin) and others. These new drugs provide several benefits such as fewer side effects or foolproof self-dosing with an insulin pen. See More

How Long Should You Keep Insulin Pens?

The GoodRx Pharmacist - May 05, 2015

Did you read our blog on insulin vials and think to yourself, does this apply to my insulin pens too? If so, this post is for you!

With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard keep track of how long each of these pens stays good.

Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your pen at the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your pen regardless of whether you have any leftover. See More

How Long Should You Keep Your Open Insulin Vials?

The GoodRx Pharmacist - April 29, 2015

With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard to keep track of when your vial should be tossed.

Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your vial by the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your vial regardless of whether you have any leftover. See More

New Insulin Toujeo: Now Approved and Available Soon!

The GoodRx Pharmacist - March 26, 2015

On February 25, 2015, the FDA approved Toujeo—a long-acting insulin indicated to improve sugar control in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

When will Toujeo be available?

According to the manufacturer, Sanofi-Aventis, Toujeo will be available at the beginning of the second quarter in 2015.

What is long-acting insulin?

Long-acting insulin can also be referred to as basal insulin. Long-acting insulin lowers blood sugar levels slowly and evenly for up to 24 hours. See More

Levemir FlexPen Is Changing to Levemir FlexTouch

The GoodRx Pharmacist - July 02, 2014

The delivery method of some drugs may be phased out or changed for a few reasons—sometimes a change might be required, like when CFC inhalers for asthma were found to be bad for the environment and replaced by the environmentally friendly HFA inhalers. Manufacturers may also find a better way to deliver their medication that makes it easier to use, and discontinue the older version.

The latest medication to be phased out is the Levemir FlexPen. See More

Long Acting Insulin Pen Essentials

The GoodRx Pharmacist - December 16, 2013

There are several different medications on the market that can help you manage your diabetes, and insulin is an important part of that regimen, used to control type 1 diabetes, or type 2 diabetes that isn’t being adequately managed by oral drugs. There are a few types of insulins available, categorized by how quickly they take effect and how long they last. These include rapid-acting, regular- or short-acting, intermdiate-acting, and long-acting insulin. See More

Which is Better, Lantus or Levemir? Duel of the New Long-Acting Insulins

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 26, 2012

Diabetes care has gotten better. Two new long acting insulins are taking over NPH insulin. They are more expensive, and many of you ask: which is better, Lantus or Levemir insulin?

Here is the story of the new long-acting insulins. For adult onset (Type II) diabetics who have been on maximum doses of diabetes pills yet need better blood sugar control, your doctor may turn to insulin. When insulin is combined with oral agents, a basal (long-acting) insulin used at night is a reasonable first choice. See More

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