Ibuprofen Non-Prescription Coupon - Ibuprofen Non-Prescription 200mg tablet

Generic Advil, Motrin IB

Ibuprofen is an NSAID used to treat fever and minor aches and pains. It works by reducing inflammation. Ibuprofen is a generic medication, and is available both over-the-counter and by prescription depending on the strength. Over-the-counter brands include Advil and Motrin IB. Prescription Motrin had the same active ingredient, but has been discontinued. Ibuprofen should be used only when needed as it may increase risk of stroke or heart attack and long term use can cause stomach bleeding and ulcers. Compare NSAIDs.
Ibuprofen Non-Prescription Coupon - Ibuprofen Non-Prescription 200mg tablet

Ibuprofen Non-Prescription Latest News

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The 6 Best Ways to Treat Acute Back Pain

Dr. Sharon Orrange - February 16, 2016

Only a third of people who have acute back pain see their doctor. In some ways this is good news—it implies that most improve on their own. If you have new onset back pain, (that you’ve been experiencing for less than 4 weeks), here some OTC and prescription medication options that can help you.

  1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). You will see more improvement of your symptoms after 1 week of taking NSAIDS than taking nothing.
  2.  See More

Is It Safe to Take Tylenol (Acetaminophen) with Advil or Motrin (Ibuprofen)?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 21, 2015

Yes, you can take them together, and they even work better in combination than separately. Several large studies have shown that ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) together work well to relieve pain, with few side effects. In fact, for many things like dental pain, they work better than many of the opioid-containing pain meds (like Vicodin or Norco).

Why is the combination safe?
Acetaminophen is cleared by the liver, while ibuprofen is cleared by the kidneys. See More

5 Common Medications That Can Kill

Dr. Sharon Orrange - July 13, 2015

You probably already know that many prescriptions have side effects. Most are mild—annoying issues like nausea or sleepiness that are inconvenient at worst. Others, however, can be deadly.

A very small number of medications are responsible for the majority of adverse side effects and hospitalizations from harmful drug reactions. How bad are these drugs? Between 2007 to 2009, almost 100,000 patients older than 65 had emergency hospitalizations for dangerous drug reactions, and almost 20,000 people die from prescription drug overdoses annually. See More

Do I Need Antibiotics for My Cough?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - December 10, 2014

Coughing brings many of you to the doctor. Most of this is acute bronchitis, an inflammation of the bronchi (airways) due to upper airway infection. For almost all of you, it is self-limited and will go away on its own. It may surprise you to know this respiratory condition is generally caused by a virus, but reports indicate that more than 60 to 90 percent of patients with acute bronchitis who come to the doctor are given antibiotics. See More

Is Celebrex Better Than Ibuprofen?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - October 29, 2014

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the treatment of acute pain and chronic inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases. The long term use of NSAIDS is restricted by the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications such as ulcers and bleeding.

Celebrex is a more selective NSAID which is marketed as having fewer GI side effects and similar effectiveness. Celebrex is more expensive and prescription-only, but is it better than ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil)? Let’s look. See More

Top Reasons Why NSAIDs Should Be the New Hydrocodone

Dr. Sharon Orrange - October 21, 2014

Pain is complex, so there is no “one pill fits all” treatment. Hydrocodone is the most prescribed medication in the United States, also marketed in combination with acetaminophen (Tylenol) under the brand names Vicodin, Norco and Lortab.

As of October 6, 2014, all drugs containing hydrocodone are schedule II drugs, and that means they are now much harder to get. There is no question this is a hassle for some patients and physicians but we (doctors) are too quick to prescribe it and for most pain, you don’t really need hydrocodone. See More

Is Tylenol (Acetaminophen) Bad for Your Stomach?

Dr. Sharon Orrange - October 07, 2014

No. Acetaminophen is safe for the stomach. Don’t confuse Tylenol (acetaminophen) with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) like ibuprofen or Motrin.

Unlike NSAIDS, Tylenol is completely safe on the stomach and won’t cause gastritis or ulcer disease.

You see, acetaminophen is not an anti-inflammatory, which can be a downside, but that means it does not inhibit prostaglandin and prostacyclin the way NSAIDS do. See More

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