Have a question about GoodRx's drug prices? Find something incorrect on the site? Interested in providing your pharmacy's prices on our site? Check the questions and answers below.

For a typical drug at a typical pharmacy, we likely have a number of prices—the “cash” price (what you pay if you just walk in and pay cash without insurance), discount prices (which involve presenting a free coupon), membership prices (which might involve you joining the pharmacy's program) and negotiated prices (if you've told us about your Medicare plan). What's important to know is this:

  1. We'll always show you the lowest price first.

    The lowest price appears first. Simply click on the pharmacy name to see other available prices.

  2. We'll always let you know if there is a fee or obligation to access a certain price.

    GoodRx is entirely free to use, but some pharmacies charge annual membership fees. Other assistance programs have income-related or other restrictions. Don't worry—we'll show you.

  3. We'll always provide instructions on how to pay that price at the pharmacy counter.

    GoodRx only lists licensed US pharmacies, and we only display prices that pharmacies are either advertising themselves or are contractually obligated to provide. If a pharmacy fails to honor a price we quote, please let us know.

We try to be as comprehensive as possible and we'd love to hear about it if you want us to track a specific drug, pharmacy or chain. Please let us know at info@goodrx.com.

Argh! We'd love to know what's wrong so we can fix it.

Before you send us a price, please note the following:

GoodRx displays cash prices for uninsured patients. If you have health insurance, Medicare, or other programs which help offset the cost of your prescriptions, the amount you pay will likely be lower. Even if you have not satisfied your prescription drug deductible, your insurance company may have negotiated a discounted price with the pharmacy.

OK, so you're not using insurance and our prices are still wrong? Please use our contact us page to let us know.

Thanks!

Speciality medications are drugs for serious health conditions that are very expensive (hundreds or thousands of dollars per fill). These drugs typically require special handling, administration, or monitoring. If you have insurance, you may need prior authorization to fill your prescription or you may have to order them through a specialty pharmacy.

Most retail pharmacies do not stock specialty medications, and most Americans do not pay the full price for these drugs. Usually an insurance company, manufacturer, or government or non-profit program provides financial support.

For more information on reducing the cost of your specialty medications, we recommend:

  1. Visiting the manufacturer’s website, which typically lists patient assistance programs.

  2. We’ve listed some additional resources at http://www.goodrx.com/faq-assistance.

For more information on specialty medications in general, see Specialty Pharmacy and Specialty Medications: What You Should Know.

Health care practitioner administered drugs are typically used in a hospital, doctor's office, or clinic setting, and are given by a doctor or other health care practitioner. These drugs can't be filled in retail pharmacies, and often treat serious health conditions. They also typically require special handling, administration, or monitoring, and can be very expensive. If you have insurance, you may need prior authorization to receive one of these drugs, and they may be covered under your medical benefits, rather than through your prescription insurance.

Most retail pharmacies do not stock health care practitioner-administered medications, and most Americans do not pay the full price for these drugs. Usually an insurance company, manufacturer, or government or non-profit program provides financial support.

For more information on reducing the cost of your specialty medications, we recommend:

  1. Visiting the manufacturer’s website, which typically lists patient assistance programs.

  2. We’ve listed some additional resources at http://www.goodrx.com/faq-assistance.

For more information on medications that must be administered by a health care practitioner, see Health Care Practitioner Administered Drugs: What You Need to Know.

It's complicated, but here's how the system works.

Most drugs aren't actually that expensive to manufacture; it's research and marketing costs that make brand name drugs expensive.

Drug consumers generally fall into one of three buckets:

  1. I Pay Cash

    If you don't have insurance, you pay cash for your drugs. You can use certain discounts and coupons to lower your cost, many of which we've listed GoodRx. It's worth mentioning that there are many government assistance programs, as well as manufacturer discounts and low-income programs that may also help offset this cash price (many of them are listed when you look up a drug on GoodRx).

  2. I Have Insurance

    If you have insurance, the price you pay for a drug depends on a few things. First, your insurance company usually negotiates a price which is lower than the actual cash price at that pharmacy. Then, it will depend on whether your prescribed drug is covered by your formulary, which is a list of approved drugs that your insurance company will pay for. Different drugs are covered by different “tiers” (levels of payment: i.e. a $10 copay, a $20 copay, 50% of negotiated price, etc). Lastly, you may have a deductible that needs to be satisfied before your insurance company will help pay for your prescriptions. This mess is why going with a $4 cash generic may be a much better route.

  3. I Have Medicare

    Medicare is similar to insurance, except that the government regulates many of the prices and covers some of the cost. The drug-related Medicare programs are Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage. These programs are optional and often require the payment of a premium.

Let's be honest—Medicare can be very confusing. Please see our Medicare FAQ for more information on how it works and how you can potentially save more.

Great! Send us an email at info@goodrx.com and we'll get right back to you.

We do have prices and manufacturer coupons for some common over-the-counter medications, but we do not offer GoodRx discounts for any non-prescription drugs. Coupons and discount cards must be used at the pharmacy counter with a prescription.

We do have prices from a mail order pharmacy for some common compounded medications, but we aren't able to offer GoodRx discounts for these drugs at this time. You can see the compounded medications we offer here.

GoodRx only displays prices for pharmacies in the United States, including Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico.

Copyright ©2016 GoodRx, Inc.

GoodRx is not sponsored by or affiliated with any of the pharmacies identified in its price comparisons. All trademarks, brands, logos and copyright images are property of their respective owners and rights holders and are used solely to represent the products of these rights holders. This information is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. GoodRx is not offering advice, recommending or endorsing any specific prescription drug, pharmacy or other information on the site. GoodRx provides no warranty for any of the pricing data or other information. Please seek medical advice before starting, changing or terminating any medical treatment.